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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and citizens are working hard to raise the profile of the disease.

Founded in 1985, charities like the American Cancer Society and Keep a Breast Foundation host yearly events informing women on how to prevent the progression of the disease to save more lives. Based on a survey by the National Cancer Institute, over 40,000 deaths are estimated to occur with breast cancer being the cause.

African American women have a higher chance of dying from the disease than white women by 40 percent. Many Harlem residents are unaware of these statistics. In efforts to change this statistic, the cancer treatment center Memorial Sloan Kettering established an outreach program right in the heart of Harlem. The Breast Examination Center of Harlem, located inside of the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building on West 125th Street, offers free mammograms to the community. Despite this available resource, residents are not taking advantage of them.

“I didn’t know they had one around here, and I’m due for one,” said Kathy, 56, a local resident. She was not alone.

Rachelle, 32, is a beauty supply sales associate at the Apollo Hair Center which is located just across the street from the State Building and the Breast Examination Center.

“I am not aware and I’ve been here for 6 months,” she said slightly shocked.

A reason for the lack of awareness of the center is the failure to approach and discuss the disease. Ashley Reynolds, student at The City College of New York, found difficulty in sharing her family’s story. Ashley’s mother is part of the 89 percent of women who have survived breast cancer. Like those who refuse to seek information and awareness, Ashley’s family neglected to inform themselves on the illness and its prevention.

“Luckily we were able to catch it early. Breast cancer is not something that runs in our family; we ignored learning all of the preventative measures to fully check for signs,” Ashley said.

Mike Evans, another student who’s been affected by breast cancer also said his cousin, Stephanie who fell victim the disease at the age of 27, failed to take proper precautions in being aware and getting checked.

“She was only 27 years old and didn’t take any measures to stop it earlier. By the time she got help about it, there was not much help she could have received from any doctor Said Evans.

Medical personnel and local merchants believe it’s a lack on the part of the people who fail to inform themselves on the matter. 55-year-old Beverly Thomas, Administrative assistant at the Visiting Nurse Service Comprehensive Care Management Office, believes local organizations do enough to inform the community on the aggressiveness of this disease. Along with other organizations over the summer, Visiting Nurse Service parked a health truck on Lenox Avenue informing locals on breast cancer and prevention.

Article source: http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2016/oct/01/building-breast-cancer-awareness/


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To list an event, send information in calendar format to Donna Thomas at donna.thomas@aviationweek.com. For a complete list of Aviation Week Network’s upcoming events, and to register, visit www.aviationweek.com/events (Bold type indicates new calendar listing.)

Oct. 4-5—SpeedNews 21st Annual Business General Aviation Industry Suppliers Conference (BGA), Jonathan Club, Los Angeles, California, www.aviationweek.com/events

Oct. 4-5—MRO Europe, RAI Amsterdam, …

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We’ve been dosing up on milk thistle for days in preparation for the wildest week in the capital’s boozy calendar, London Cocktail Week (October 3-9). But here’s a bit of formal preparation for all you cocktail connoisseurs: five events taking place during LCW that are hotter than a Flaming Martini.

Sailor Jerry Tattoo Shop

 

Sailor Jerry's Tattoo Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course you’ve thought about getting that tattoo after a few drinks. We all have. But do a whole lot more than think about the ink at Sailor Jerry’s pop-up up tattoo shop taking over east London’s Cloak Dagger. All those with LCW wristbands are entitled to a free tatt from 1pm-6pm on Friday 7 and Saturday 8. Choose a classic design by Norman ‘Sailor Jerry’ Collins and numb the pain with a Ginger Colada Slushy. It’s like Malaga ’06 all over again.

World Class House

World class house, london cocktail week

 

 

 

 

If you’re not venturing to Spitalfields, enjoy the LCW experience right in the heart of the capital at Diageo’s World Class House. The space is divided into two bars, one looking back at our fave retro drinks (pina colada, purlease!), the other looking to the future of mixology. Inside you’ll also find a Tanqueray forest to gather your own botanicals and a Ketel One Kitchen looking at how you can spice up your plain old Bloody Mary.

Woodford Reserve Alliance

Woodford Reserve Alliance

 

 

 

Want to sample some of the world’s best bars without even leaving London? Well, pal, step this way! Woodford Reserve have pulled out the big guns for a three-night pop-up at Shoreditch’s White Rabbit Studios, pitting three of London’s best bars against three from around the world, all mixing the best whisky cocktails. Pitch up on Tuesday to see Nightjar and Stockholm’s Little Quarter side by side. Thursday hosts the Peg Patriot V Amsterdam’s The Tailor. And Wednesday (our personal favourite) sees Time Out’s Bar of the Year The Punch Room joined by New York’s British pub the Suffolk Arms. Jolly good show. 

Monkey Shoulder Café

 

Monkey Shoulder Cafe

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every year, Monkey Shoulder showcases the winning talent of its Ultimate Bartender Championships by letting them host their very own bar at the festival. And this is the kind of bar we’d monkey around in forever. Winner Dave ‘Flat’ White will serve up frothy coffee cocktails and tea-tinged tipples within Spitalfields’ Cocktail Village. We particularly like the sound of Coffee Donuts, a drink made from whisky, cold brew coffee, caramel and a donut infusion. Screw the diet.

Bombay Sapphire x Cahoots

 

Bombay Sapphire x Cahoots

 

 

 

 

Fans of quirky Cahoots, the vintage underground-themed bar in Soho’s Kingly Court, will be excited to learn that one of its tube carriages is rolling in to Spitalfields for the week. The bar has teamed up with Bombay Sapphire to transport passengers to Laverstocke, where the gin is crafted. With a menu inspired by Enid Blyton’s The Famous Five, this one’s for the playful drinkers. All aboard!

For more info on events at LCW visit www.drinkup.london/cocktailweek.

To buy two wristbands for £10, click here.

And check our LCW hub to find out which of London’s best bars are taking part in London Cocktail Week.

Article source: http://www.timeout.com/london/blog/tattoos-tubes-and-coffee-cocktails-its-the-best-events-at-london-cocktail-week-093016


Sandman Sims, also known as Howard Sims, was a renowned artist, legendary tap performer and a beloved member of the Harlem’s Apollo Theater and community.

Sims’ granddaughter, Tatianna Sims, recently organized the Sandman Sims Tribute in his honor during the Harlem Week festivities. The tribute served as a showcase of performers to honor Sandman Sims’ legacy and his love for the arts. The tribute included performances by the likes of Meli’sa Morgan, Maurice Chestnut, Cartier Conway and Eric G.

Tatianna Sims recalled her grandfather’s saying, “It’s not the steps, but the sound.”

“He made sure that tap didn’t die,” said Sims in an interview. “He always wanted young people to understand the arts and to understand the craft of it. While he was still alive, he would be known to walk around with tap shoes in his back pocket and he would challenge a young person for a step or two.”

Sandman Sims was not only a pioneer in his community through the work he did at the Apollo Theater but also his service as a cultural ambassador for the United States. He traveled the world, teaching people about art and craftsmanship. “It’s all about improvisation and you just challenging yourself to inspire others and take up the craft of your dreams,” said Tatianna Sims.

She recalled her grandfather’s love for the arts as being an integral part of his life from a young age. “When he was younger, growing up, that was the way the family put food on the table,” she said. “All the boys and girls all learned tap from their father.”

The name Sandman originated from Sims’ early start in the boxing profession. He became known for his fast and effortless footwork in the ring and the way he danced in a sandbox before getting into the ring. His swift foot movements became known as the “sand dance.” Sims went on to train Muhammad Ali in his boxing footwork.

Sims’ legacy consists of a Sandman Sims concert series and further upcoming arts celebration events. More information can be found at www.challenge-entertainment.com.

The tribute was born of a desire to spread Sims’ legacy and love for diversity in the arts and serve as a reminder to celebrate togetherness and diversity, fundamental principles for which Sandman Sims stood. Sims, who starred in the film “Tap” and is featured in the documentary “No Maps on My Taps,” continues to be an inspiration for this generation’s aspiring artists.

Article source: http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2016/sep/30/sandman-sims-tribute-his-legacy/


A 68-year-old Dutch man with an impossibly long name and a small dog is walking along the edge of a new lake when he stops and points upward.

“Naturally, the water would be up there, you know,” says Erik van Tienhoven van Weezel, pointing at an invisible spot about 10 feet above his head. “We live under the sea level, by quite a bit. And we know the water is a little higher each year. Do we lose sleep over what could happen if the dikes break? Do we worry about how we will survive as the climate gets warmer and the sea gets even higher? No. We have adapted for centuries. We will continue to adapt.”

As far as Dutch adaptation to rising water goes, van Tienhoven van Weezel is at ground zero. Almere, a city of 190,000, used to be covered by the Zuiderzee, a well-known bay of the North Sea that once cut a 60-mile hole out of the northern part of the Netherlands. But the Netherlands has been using windmills and dikes and a network of canals for centuries to expand the tiny nation into the often violent sea, and now the Zuiderzee is dry land. Almere is an example of Dutch success; about 15 percent of the Netherlands used to be covered by ocean waters.

And that lesson, say European climatologists, is an important one for the United States, where studies indicate that large areas of coastal cities such as Miami are likely to disappear under rising seawaters, not in centuries, but in decades. The key, they say, is for U.S. politicians to stop debating the cause of sea level rise and start planning and funding the works that can stave it off.

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Whose job is it to save the beach?

The Atlantic Ocean is eroding parts of North Topsail Beach by about five feet per year. The town of 800 residents is running out of cash and solutions in its efforts to protect its north shore. Whose job is to save this popular North Carolina tourist dest

Brittany Peterson and Sohail Al-Jamea
McClatchy

“Adapt or die,” says the T-shirt of a man walking through Almere’s town square. The initials NAP are bricked into a staircase nearby, marking where the Normal Amsterdam Peil, or normal Amsterdam water level, would be, way above his head, were it not for the pumps and dikes that hold back the sea.

In Potsdam, Germany, climate scientist Anders Levermann is chatting about how the world will change in a future of rising seas when he is asked about Miami.

“Miami? Miami is already doomed,” he says.

The sea level expert at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, pauses, then starts to correct himself. “That’s probably not fair,” he says. “Miami is, ah. . . . No, it’s just doomed.”

Among climate scientists, Miami has earned the nickname “New Atlantis,” a reference to the legendary lost continent that slipped below the sea. But Miami is hardly alone among at-risk cities. A World Bank study listed it second among cities facing a risk of “overall cost of damage.” It trailed only Guangzhou in southern China, and it’s expected to fare only a bit better than New York and New Orleans.

The list of cities facing issues over the next 100 years rings the United States. An interactive map on the website of the U.S. climate scientist group ClimateChange gives an idea of what might be in store over the next 100 years.

South Carolina, for example, would see a sea level rise of 4 feet within 100 years. Hilton Head Island would be further isolated. The Waccamaw River would spread out, leaving southern Myrtle Beach as a peninsula. Texas might see a 3-foot rise before the end of this century, flooding sections of Galveston and other coastal lowlands.

In Miami, the sea is expected to rise a foot perhaps as soon as 2040, and reach 5 feet as early as 2080. At that point, the water starts taking over low-lying areas along the Miami River. Within 100 years, it could wash over most of Miami Beach and start swamping neighborhoods along the river.

We do have options. But we need to be making plans. Anders Levermann, climate scientist

Such increases are further off on the West Coast, though not by much.

Too far in the future to take seriously? The Dutch have already approved spending a billion dollars a year for the next 100 years to deal with the threat of the sea.

“This is not a time, yet, for panic,” Levermann says. “This is, however, a time to be making plans, for deciding what we are going to do to protect people and cities and nations around the world from the rising water. We do have options. But we need to be making plans.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Unfortunately, in the United States, there is no central planning or discussion of how to cope with such sea level rise. People are too busy arguing about whether water levels are actually rising, and what is causing it, though the science is pretty much settled. Sea levels are going up.

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Miami Beach waging a battle against sea level rise

As some streets flood from king tide events, Miami Beach launched an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. The city will spend between $400 to $500 million over the next five years. (From March 15, 2016.)

Emily Michot
Miami Herald

Asked whether the United States has a plan for how to deal with rising seas, Ernesta Jones, a spokesperson for the Environmental Protection Agency, wrote in an email: “The short answer is no. There is no national program (or EPA program) or overall plan to decide what places will be protected using which techniques, or . . . decide which will not be protected.”

Levermann and others say that is a mistake, even if you aren’t a believer that global warming is a man-made phenomenon. They liken it to the idea of buying door locks, alarms and other anti-burglary defenses for a home. Nobody does this with definite knowledge that their home will be burglarized. Instead, these things are purchased and installed in the hopes that a home can avoid, or thwart, burglars.

“We can protect ourselves against sea level rise, if we aren’t stupid, if we don’t deny there is a problem and if we take this problem seriously,” Levermann says. “All coastal cities are threatened.”

But that doesn’t mean that any coastal cities are doomed. Half of the Netherlands exists below sea level. The nation has thrived for hundreds of years because of what the Dutch call “water defenses.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

Paul Olsen, a sea level expert at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, is running a program that’s looking at how the United States can adapt. He emphasizes that while the water is rising, there are options. Current U.S. strategies, he says, are “fledgling.”

“They don’t have the funding or the national attention that’s needed,” he says. “I don’t think we’re ignoring it. We’ve had other priorities. We’ve focused on terrorism, and al Qaida and ISIL (the Islamic State). These are the wolves that are closest to the sled. Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Olsen says there is no simple and one-size-fits-all solution to the problems that sea level rise will bring. There is no way the United States will be able to surround all of its cities with sea walls.

“The United States is just too big. There’s too much coastline,” he says. The U.S. has about 12,000 miles of ocean and sea coastline. By comparison, the Netherlands protects 270 miles of seacoast.

The American reality is that some cities will probably be sacrificed. Parts of cities certainly will be sacrificed.

Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming. Paul Olsen, Old Dominion University

“The U.S. coasts will look very different in 50 years,” Olsen says. “We’re going to have to learn to be like Venice, to learn to live with water.”

More land will be returned to wetlands, he predicts. Cities will move to higher ground and abandon neighborhoods in lowlands. People who elect to stay on the coast will have to adapt their homes for high water.

“You may have to defend a harbor, if a community relies on shipping or fishing. But do the fishermen need to live next to the harbor?” he says. “No. So maybe you defend the harbor and roads to that harbor, but you don’t have to save the neighborhoods in low-lying areas. If a community relies on the tourism attracted by its beaches, they may have to modify and save their beaches, and access to the beaches. But sacrifices will have to be made.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

The solution will rely on an overarching federal plan – one that does not yet exist – but also on local and state planning. Coastal cities, he believes, have four options: Defend, adapt, retreat and avoid.

“Defend” means sea walls, keeping the sea out. The Dutch approach. “Adapt” means creative thinking, raising buildings, raising neighborhoods, living with canals. This is Venice. “Retreat” is simply heading inland. Already, on a small scale, Alaskan Inuit tribes are employing this strategy. They don’t have the means to keep the sea at bay, so they take advantage of one of the great advantages of the United States, lots of higher ground. “Avoid” is simply making sure that new construction, roads, sewer and water systems are built with sea level rise in mind.

Incredible things are possible. Consider the lake surrounding Almere. It is a freshwater lake, separated from the North Sea by a 16-mile-long dike, one that was built into the sea. Elsewhere, Dutch water defenses include robotic dams that move into place only when needed, and that rise and fall with the water to protect the nation during storms. These defenses are the result of centuries of practice, and they have taken decades to plan and years to construct.

3,000 Number of years the Netherlands has been pushing back the sea

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

While no plan exists in general for the United States, the federal government has been readying a plan for dealing with its own properties, according to Kate White, an Army Corp of Engineers civil engineer specializing in climate change issues. A plan for how the government should react to sea level rise is nearing completion.

Federal agencies for the past several years have been “assessing their own exposure to climate change, dealing with everything from the changes in snowmelt to sea level rise.” One precaution: The federal government no longer is building in floodplains.

Of 5,000 existing construction projects, reviewers determined that 1,400 were likely to be affected by sea level rise. Of those, they “determined 100 that were in high or very high impact zones. In a couple years, we will have recommendations from that list. At that point we will be able to say what is possible.”

She says that given the early stage of all such planning, she isn’t able to release a list of the projects, but the ways the risks will be dealt with will likely encompass a range of solutions: construction of sea walls and pumping systems, changes of policy and the incorporation of natural features, such as mangroves and coastal wetlands.

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

To understand how completely a nation can commit to this sort of project, consider the Netherlands. The Dutch have been fighting to hold back the water since the end of the Iron Age, 3,000 years ago.

In the 1700s a wood-eating mollusk started destroying Dutch dikes at an astonishing rate, so the dikes were converted to stone and clay. Windmills churned night and day to pump out excess water. As land was recaptured, it became a patchwork of fertile fields and canals for drainage. It even fed the global image of the nation, most famously in Mary Mapes Dodge’s story of the Little Dutch Boy, who plugged a leaking dike with his finger.

That system held the nation together until 1953, when rising seas and flooding rivers led to bursting dikes and a flood that submerged half the country and left 1,800 dead.

The dikes were rebuilt, stronger and bigger. Today the Netherlands spends almost 0.2 percent of its annual economic output – about $1.1 billion – on what it calls “water defense.” Converting that to an equivalent American amount would be about $35 billion a year. For comparison, that’s about 6 percent of the 2015 U.S. defense budget of $560 billion.

Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants. We are entering an age where they are not. Ben Strauss, Climate Central

“What we, the Dutch, are doing is quite rational,” says Jarl Kind, a water economist for the Dutch Delta Commission, which oversees keeping the nation dry. “There are two ways to deal with the threat of floods: Wait for the floods and repair what is lost. Or build an infrastructure to mitigate flood damage. Given what we could lose, it’s not a lot of money to spend.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

The U.S. economy, of course, is much bigger – and the potential losses are, too. A 2014 report on the economic risks of sea level rise chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former U.S Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson Jr. warned that by 2050 as much as $106 billion worth of coastal property could be underwater. By 2100, flooding would have reclaimed another $507 billion worth of property, with another $730 billion in property under threat during high tides.

The U.S. Department of Commerce and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration put out a fact sheet saying U.S. businesses along the “coast produce 45 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product.” In 2015, for instance, that would have meant $8.3 trillion of production would have been in threatened areas.

“Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants,” says Ben Strauss, vice president for sea level and climate impacts at Climate Central. “We are entering an age where they are not.”

In Almere, Gennil Dijkink, 60, explains that once climate change is accepted as reality– and there is no debate here – getting around to the business of adapting and living with the water only makes sense.

“My house is below the water level,” he says. “In fact, I’m only about a kilometer away from a dike. If it broke, I am dead. But I sleep very comfortably at night. We have a saying here: As the water rises, so must the dikes. It’s quite simple, really.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

Olsen, at Old Dominion University, thinks it won’t be long before sea level rise becomes a U.S. national priority. Too much is at stake for it to be put on a back burner for long. Unlike Levermann, he does not think Miami is lost. There’s too much at risk. Buildings will be lifted, neighborhoods will be walled, beaches will somehow be saved. Canals will crisscross the area.

“Miami will find a solution. I am confident of this,” he says. “I’m more worried about poorer, less organized coastal communities. Coastal cities are all at risk, and many won’t have the investment needed for creative solutions.”

Matthew Schofield: @mattschodcnews

Article source: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nation-world/national/article104917846.html


Line-up: DJ QU | Fred P | Secret Sundaze | Patrice Scott | Volcov | Hiver | Paul Johnson aka Dance Mania | Tom Trago | Andrea Fiorito 

De Marktkantine ADE Day 5 | Maeve SoHaSo | De Marktkantine | Tickets

Maeve is a house music label initially started by the Irishmen The Drifter and Mano Le Tough. Brought together by “the passion for deep emotive music”, men are releasing music of Baikal, Dixon, Ripperton, and of course themselves. For Maeve’s ADE showcase the label heads invited Rotterdam’s very own Mattheis and a very special guest  – Gilb’R. Yes yes and again yes! There is something to really look forward to hear, when we are talking of this French pioneer, a man of the hunch rather than the trend, the visionary and the voice behind Versatile Records, Gilbert Cohen.

Meanwhile, Marktkantine’s second room will be held in the arms of Maeve’s friend, Nuno Dos Santos and his Something Happened Somewhere label and event night, where he invites the local heroes: TsepoLove Over Entropy along with a live house set by Mathias Schober and Konstantin Sibold.

Line-up: Gilb’R | Mattheis | The Drifter | Baikal | Mano Le Tough | Mathias Schober a.k.a SHOW-B | Love Over Entropy | Konstantin Sibold | Nuno dos Santos | Tsepo

Word is out, Detroit legend Theo Parrish all night long. One could not have a better ground for instituting one’s love for house music – growing up in Chicago, starting to spin and record at the age of thirteen in the mid 80s, moving to Michigan and getting heavily involved with Detroit’s underground scene. In his career he has even worked in a record store, where Theo establishing his passion and love for the holy record. Thus await loads of Shazam misconnections and steady old school Chicago frequencies building up the last night of the festival.

Het Weekend 22.10 – 24.10 | De School | Tickets

One of the perks of De School owning a 24 hour licence is occasions like Het Weekend, where the full family of the club masters, many coming from their predecessor Trouw take over for their ADE showcase. Joined by Âme and Dixon will be the full team of Amsterdam’s very own Jasper Wolff Maarten Mittendorff, Tom Trago, Makam, Dekmantel Soundsystem, Elias Mazian, Job Jobse, Carlos Valdes, Sandrien and JP Enfant and more.

Line-up: Âme | Dixon | Jennifer Cardini | Tom Trago | Makam | Dekmantel Soundsystem | Elias Mazian | Job Jobse | Carlos Valdes | Sandrien | JP Enfant | Lena Willikens | Jasper Wolff Maarten Mittendorff | Izabel

Article source: http://www.deephouseamsterdam.com/ade16-essentials-sunday-23-october/


De gemeentelijke nieuwbouw site die u informeert over alle nieuwbouwprojecten, koop- en huurwoningen, in Almere.
Hier vindt u een compleet overzicht van al het actuele- en toekomstige aanbod van nieuwbouw woningen in Almere.
Naast projectmatige huizen treft u hier ook de projecten aan voor CPO (collectieve zelfbouw) en PO ( Particuliere bouwkavels)

  • Populair project in Actueel aanbod: Bouwgroep Kopenhagen
  • Populair project in Actueel aanbod: Groothuis Almere
  • Populair project in Actueel aanbod: Bouwgroep Almere zoekt leden
  • Populair project in Actueel aanbod: Nobelhorst
  • Populair project in Actueel aanbod: Noorderplassen
  • Populair project in Toekomstig aanbod: Homeruskwartier
  • Populair project in Toekomstig aanbod: Vogelhorst
  • Populair project in Toekomstig aanbod: Nobelhorst De Dorpshaven (kavels)
  • Meer informatie over zelfbouw of uw project aanmelden?

Interesse in een nieuwbouw rijwoning, vrijstaand huis of (starters) appartement? Gezamenlijk (duurzaam) bouwen in een CPO-initiatief? Op zoek naar de ideale locatie voor uw toekomstige nieuwbouw huis? Schrijf u in en maak uw interesse kenbaar.

Via nieuwbouw-in-almere.nl blijft u automatisch op de hoogte van alle nieuwbouw ontwikkelingen in de regio en kunt u de gemeente en ontwikkelaars laten weten hoe u wilt wonen.

Article source: https://www.nieuwbouw-in-almere.nl/


A 68-year-old Dutch man with an impossibly long name and a small dog is walking along the edge of a new lake when he stops and points upward.

“Naturally, the water would be up there, you know,” says Erik van Tienhoven van Weezel, pointing at an invisible spot about 10 feet above his head. “We live under the sea level, by quite a bit. And we know the water is a little higher each year. Do we lose sleep over what could happen if the dikes break? Do we worry about how we will survive as the climate gets warmer and the sea gets even higher? No. We have adapted for centuries. We will continue to adapt.”

As far as Dutch adaptation to rising water goes, van Tienhoven van Weezel is at ground zero. Almere, a city of 190,000, used to be covered by the Zuiderzee, a well-known bay of the North Sea that once cut a 60-mile hole out of the northern part of the Netherlands. But the Netherlands has been using windmills and dikes and a network of canals for centuries to expand the tiny nation into the often violent sea, and now the Zuiderzee is dry land. Almere is an example of Dutch success; about 15 percent of the Netherlands used to be covered by ocean waters.

And that lesson, say European climatologists, is an important one for the United States, where studies indicate that large areas of coastal cities such as Miami are likely to disappear under rising seawaters, not in centuries, but in decades. The key, they say, is for U.S. politicians to stop debating the cause of sea level rise and start planning and funding the works that can stave it off.

More Videos

Terror in Brussels2:36 The eyes don’t lie, she wasn’t Princess Di1:31 Renew Our Rivers returns to clean the Pascagoula shoreline1:18 Finding a body was 'pretty traumatizing,' fisherman says1:19 East Central's Tony Brown talks about huge numbers1:01 Sports Guys: Week 75:22 Former stripper felt like 'a piece of meat,' but would he do it again?2:09 Brittney Reese clinic gives blind athlete a chance to learn from a pro2:33 Biloxi police investigate fatal shooting scene1:08 Stone RB Terrion Avery celebrates huge performance1:14 Gulfport tops St. Martin in overtime thriller2:02 Singer Dian Diaz brings touch of Las Vegas to Beau Rivage2:08


Whose job is it to save the beach?

The Atlantic Ocean is eroding parts of North Topsail Beach by about five feet per year. The town of 800 residents is running out of cash and solutions in its efforts to protect its north shore. Whose job is to save this popular North Carolina tourist dest

Brittany Peterson and Sohail Al-Jamea
McClatchy

“Adapt or die,” says the T-shirt of a man walking through Almere’s town square. The initials NAP are bricked into a staircase nearby, marking where the Normal Amsterdam Peil, or normal Amsterdam water level, would be, way above his head, were it not for the pumps and dikes that hold back the sea.

In Potsdam, Germany, climate scientist Anders Levermann is chatting about how the world will change in a future of rising seas when he is asked about Miami.

“Miami? Miami is already doomed,” he says.

The sea level expert at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, pauses, then starts to correct himself. “That’s probably not fair,” he says. “Miami is, ah. . . . No, it’s just doomed.”

Among climate scientists, Miami has earned the nickname “New Atlantis,” a reference to the legendary lost continent that slipped below the sea. But Miami is hardly alone among at-risk cities. A World Bank study listed it second among cities facing a risk of “overall cost of damage.” It trailed only Guangzhou in southern China, and it’s expected to fare only a bit better than New York and New Orleans.

The list of cities facing issues over the next 100 years rings the United States. An interactive map on the website of the U.S. climate scientist group ClimateChange gives an idea of what might be in store over the next 100 years.

South Carolina, for example, would see a sea level rise of 4 feet within 100 years. Hilton Head Island would be further isolated. The Waccamaw River would spread out, leaving southern Myrtle Beach as a peninsula. Texas might see a 3-foot rise before the end of this century, flooding sections of Galveston and other coastal lowlands.

In Miami, the sea is expected to rise a foot perhaps as soon as 2040, and reach 5 feet as early as 2080. At that point, the water starts taking over low-lying areas along the Miami River. Within 100 years, it could wash over most of Miami Beach and start swamping neighborhoods along the river.

We do have options. But we need to be making plans. Anders Levermann, climate scientist

Such increases are further off on the West Coast, though not by much.

Too far in the future to take seriously? The Dutch have already approved spending a billion dollars a year for the next 100 years to deal with the threat of the sea.

“This is not a time, yet, for panic,” Levermann says. “This is, however, a time to be making plans, for deciding what we are going to do to protect people and cities and nations around the world from the rising water. We do have options. But we need to be making plans.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Unfortunately, in the United States, there is no central planning or discussion of how to cope with such sea level rise. People are too busy arguing about whether water levels are actually rising, and what is causing it, though the science is pretty much settled. Sea levels are going up.

More Videos

Terror in Brussels2:36 The eyes don’t lie, she wasn’t Princess Di1:31 Renew Our Rivers returns to clean the Pascagoula shoreline1:18 Finding a body was 'pretty traumatizing,' fisherman says1:19 East Central's Tony Brown talks about huge numbers1:01 Sports Guys: Week 75:22 Former stripper felt like 'a piece of meat,' but would he do it again?2:09 Brittney Reese clinic gives blind athlete a chance to learn from a pro2:33 Biloxi police investigate fatal shooting scene1:08 Stone RB Terrion Avery celebrates huge performance1:14 Gulfport tops St. Martin in overtime thriller2:02 Singer Dian Diaz brings touch of Las Vegas to Beau Rivage2:08


Miami Beach waging a battle against sea level rise

As some streets flood from king tide events, Miami Beach launched an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. The city will spend between $400 to $500 million over the next five years. (From March 15, 2016.)

Emily Michot
Miami Herald

Asked whether the United States has a plan for how to deal with rising seas, Ernesta Jones, a spokesperson for the Environmental Protection Agency, wrote in an email: “The short answer is no. There is no national program (or EPA program) or overall plan to decide what places will be protected using which techniques, or . . . decide which will not be protected.”

Levermann and others say that is a mistake, even if you aren’t a believer that global warming is a man-made phenomenon. They liken it to the idea of buying door locks, alarms and other anti-burglary defenses for a home. Nobody does this with definite knowledge that their home will be burglarized. Instead, these things are purchased and installed in the hopes that a home can avoid, or thwart, burglars.

“We can protect ourselves against sea level rise, if we aren’t stupid, if we don’t deny there is a problem and if we take this problem seriously,” Levermann says. “All coastal cities are threatened.”

But that doesn’t mean that any coastal cities are doomed. Half of the Netherlands exists below sea level. The nation has thrived for hundreds of years because of what the Dutch call “water defenses.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

Paul Olsen, a sea level expert at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, is running a program that’s looking at how the United States can adapt. He emphasizes that while the water is rising, there are options. Current U.S. strategies, he says, are “fledgling.”

“They don’t have the funding or the national attention that’s needed,” he says. “I don’t think we’re ignoring it. We’ve had other priorities. We’ve focused on terrorism, and al Qaida and ISIL (the Islamic State). These are the wolves that are closest to the sled. Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Olsen says there is no simple and one-size-fits-all solution to the problems that sea level rise will bring. There is no way the United States will be able to surround all of its cities with sea walls.

“The United States is just too big. There’s too much coastline,” he says. The U.S. has about 12,000 miles of ocean and sea coastline. By comparison, the Netherlands protects 270 miles of seacoast.

The American reality is that some cities will probably be sacrificed. Parts of cities certainly will be sacrificed.

Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming. Paul Olsen, Old Dominion University

“The U.S. coasts will look very different in 50 years,” Olsen says. “We’re going to have to learn to be like Venice, to learn to live with water.”

More land will be returned to wetlands, he predicts. Cities will move to higher ground and abandon neighborhoods in lowlands. People who elect to stay on the coast will have to adapt their homes for high water.

“You may have to defend a harbor, if a community relies on shipping or fishing. But do the fishermen need to live next to the harbor?” he says. “No. So maybe you defend the harbor and roads to that harbor, but you don’t have to save the neighborhoods in low-lying areas. If a community relies on the tourism attracted by its beaches, they may have to modify and save their beaches, and access to the beaches. But sacrifices will have to be made.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

The solution will rely on an overarching federal plan – one that does not yet exist – but also on local and state planning. Coastal cities, he believes, have four options: Defend, adapt, retreat and avoid.

“Defend” means sea walls, keeping the sea out. The Dutch approach. “Adapt” means creative thinking, raising buildings, raising neighborhoods, living with canals. This is Venice. “Retreat” is simply heading inland. Already, on a small scale, Alaskan Inuit tribes are employing this strategy. They don’t have the means to keep the sea at bay, so they take advantage of one of the great advantages of the United States, lots of higher ground. “Avoid” is simply making sure that new construction, roads, sewer and water systems are built with sea level rise in mind.

Incredible things are possible. Consider the lake surrounding Almere. It is a freshwater lake, separated from the North Sea by a 16-mile-long dike, one that was built into the sea. Elsewhere, Dutch water defenses include robotic dams that move into place only when needed, and that rise and fall with the water to protect the nation during storms. These defenses are the result of centuries of practice, and they have taken decades to plan and years to construct.

3,000 Number of years the Netherlands has been pushing back the sea

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

While no plan exists in general for the United States, the federal government has been readying a plan for dealing with its own properties, according to Kate White, an Army Corp of Engineers civil engineer specializing in climate change issues. A plan for how the government should react to sea level rise is nearing completion.

Federal agencies for the past several years have been “assessing their own exposure to climate change, dealing with everything from the changes in snowmelt to sea level rise.” One precaution: The federal government no longer is building in floodplains.

Of 5,000 existing construction projects, reviewers determined that 1,400 were likely to be affected by sea level rise. Of those, they “determined 100 that were in high or very high impact zones. In a couple years, we will have recommendations from that list. At that point we will be able to say what is possible.”

She says that given the early stage of all such planning, she isn’t able to release a list of the projects, but the ways the risks will be dealt with will likely encompass a range of solutions: construction of sea walls and pumping systems, changes of policy and the incorporation of natural features, such as mangroves and coastal wetlands.

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

To understand how completely a nation can commit to this sort of project, consider the Netherlands. The Dutch have been fighting to hold back the water since the end of the Iron Age, 3,000 years ago.

In the 1700s a wood-eating mollusk started destroying Dutch dikes at an astonishing rate, so the dikes were converted to stone and clay. Windmills churned night and day to pump out excess water. As land was recaptured, it became a patchwork of fertile fields and canals for drainage. It even fed the global image of the nation, most famously in Mary Mapes Dodge’s story of the Little Dutch Boy, who plugged a leaking dike with his finger.

That system held the nation together until 1953, when rising seas and flooding rivers led to bursting dikes and a flood that submerged half the country and left 1,800 dead.

The dikes were rebuilt, stronger and bigger. Today the Netherlands spends almost 0.2 percent of its annual economic output – about $1.1 billion – on what it calls “water defense.” Converting that to an equivalent American amount would be about $35 billion a year. For comparison, that’s about 6 percent of the 2015 U.S. defense budget of $560 billion.

Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants. We are entering an age where they are not. Ben Strauss, Climate Central

“What we, the Dutch, are doing is quite rational,” says Jarl Kind, a water economist for the Dutch Delta Commission, which oversees keeping the nation dry. “There are two ways to deal with the threat of floods: Wait for the floods and repair what is lost. Or build an infrastructure to mitigate flood damage. Given what we could lose, it’s not a lot of money to spend.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

The U.S. economy, of course, is much bigger – and the potential losses are, too. A 2014 report on the economic risks of sea level rise chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former U.S Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson Jr. warned that by 2050 as much as $106 billion worth of coastal property could be underwater. By 2100, flooding would have reclaimed another $507 billion worth of property, with another $730 billion in property under threat during high tides.

The U.S. Department of Commerce and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration put out a fact sheet saying U.S. businesses along the “coast produce 45 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product.” In 2015, for instance, that would have meant $8.3 trillion of production would have been in threatened areas.

“Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants,” says Ben Strauss, vice president for sea level and climate impacts at Climate Central. “We are entering an age where they are not.”

In Almere, Gennil Dijkink, 60, explains that once climate change is accepted as reality– and there is no debate here – getting around to the business of adapting and living with the water only makes sense.

“My house is below the water level,” he says. “In fact, I’m only about a kilometer away from a dike. If it broke, I am dead. But I sleep very comfortably at night. We have a saying here: As the water rises, so must the dikes. It’s quite simple, really.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

Olsen, at Old Dominion University, thinks it won’t be long before sea level rise becomes a U.S. national priority. Too much is at stake for it to be put on a back burner for long. Unlike Levermann, he does not think Miami is lost. There’s too much at risk. Buildings will be lifted, neighborhoods will be walled, beaches will somehow be saved. Canals will crisscross the area.

“Miami will find a solution. I am confident of this,” he says. “I’m more worried about poorer, less organized coastal communities. Coastal cities are all at risk, and many won’t have the investment needed for creative solutions.”

Matthew Schofield: @mattschodcnews

Article source: http://www.sunherald.com/news/nation-world/world/article104920651.html


A 68-year-old Dutch man with an impossibly long name and a small dog is walking along the edge of a new lake when he stops and points upward.

“Naturally, the water would be up there, you know,” says Erik van Tienhoven van Weezel, pointing at an invisible spot about 10 feet above his head. “We live under the sea level, by quite a bit. And we know the water is a little higher each year. Do we lose sleep over what could happen if the dikes break? Do we worry about how we will survive as the climate gets warmer and the sea gets even higher? No. We have adapted for centuries. We will continue to adapt.”

As far as Dutch adaptation to rising water goes, van Tienhoven van Weezel is at ground zero. Almere, a city of 190,000, used to be covered by the Zuiderzee, a well-known bay of the North Sea that once cut a 60-mile hole out of the northern part of the Netherlands. But the Netherlands has been using windmills and dikes and a network of canals for centuries to expand the tiny nation into the often violent sea, and now the Zuiderzee is dry land. Almere is an example of Dutch success; about 15 percent of the Netherlands used to be covered by ocean waters.

And that lesson, say European climatologists, is an important one for the United States, where studies indicate that large areas of coastal cities such as Miami are likely to disappear under rising seawaters, not in centuries, but in decades. The key, they say, is for U.S. politicians to stop debating the cause of sea level rise and start planning and funding the works that can stave it off.

More Videos

Outrage Over EpiPen Pricing1:32 A timeline of the Charlotte police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott3:36 Out of the Darkness3:52 Obama pledges support to? help? rebuild? flood-ravaged? southern Louisiana2:04 Five Ways to Help Protect Your Identity1:26 Hijacked Computer: What to Do1:38 Washington D.C. urges unity and reform after a week of violence1:57 Thousands of protesters in NYC respond to shootings by police0:44 PBS apologizes for Fourth of July broadcast1:01 Watch war veterans gather at Fresno airport for 10th Honor Flight1:29 Tiny golfer, big swing0:48 American flag etiquette with U.S. Marines1:38


Whose job is it to save the beach?

The Atlantic Ocean is eroding parts of North Topsail Beach by about five feet per year. The town of 800 residents is running out of cash and solutions in its efforts to protect its north shore. Whose job is to save this popular North Carolina tourist dest

Brittany Peterson and Sohail Al-Jamea
McClatchy

“Adapt or die,” says the T-shirt of a man walking through Almere’s town square. The initials NAP are bricked into a staircase nearby, marking where the Normal Amsterdam Peil, or normal Amsterdam water level, would be, way above his head, were it not for the pumps and dikes that hold back the sea.

In Potsdam, Germany, climate scientist Anders Levermann is chatting about how the world will change in a future of rising seas when he is asked about Miami.

“Miami? Miami is already doomed,” he says.

The sea level expert at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, pauses, then starts to correct himself. “That’s probably not fair,” he says. “Miami is, ah. . . . No, it’s just doomed.”

Among climate scientists, Miami has earned the nickname “New Atlantis,” a reference to the legendary lost continent that slipped below the sea. But Miami is hardly alone among at-risk cities. A World Bank study listed it second among cities facing a risk of “overall cost of damage.” It trailed only Guangzhou in southern China, and it’s expected to fare only a bit better than New York and New Orleans.

The list of cities facing issues over the next 100 years rings the United States. An interactive map on the website of the U.S. climate scientist group ClimateChange gives an idea of what might be in store over the next 100 years.

South Carolina, for example, would see a sea level rise of 4 feet within 100 years. Hilton Head Island would be further isolated. The Waccamaw River would spread out, leaving southern Myrtle Beach as a peninsula. Texas might see a 3-foot rise before the end of this century, flooding sections of Galveston and other coastal lowlands.

In Miami, the sea is expected to rise a foot perhaps as soon as 2040, and reach 5 feet as early as 2080. At that point, the water starts taking over low-lying areas along the Miami River. Within 100 years, it could wash over most of Miami Beach and start swamping neighborhoods along the river.

We do have options. But we need to be making plans. Anders Levermann, climate scientist

Such increases are further off on the West Coast, though not by much.

Too far in the future to take seriously? The Dutch have already approved spending a billion dollars a year for the next 100 years to deal with the threat of the sea.

“This is not a time, yet, for panic,” Levermann says. “This is, however, a time to be making plans, for deciding what we are going to do to protect people and cities and nations around the world from the rising water. We do have options. But we need to be making plans.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Unfortunately, in the United States, there is no central planning or discussion of how to cope with such sea level rise. People are too busy arguing about whether water levels are actually rising, and what is causing it, though the science is pretty much settled. Sea levels are going up.

More Videos

Outrage Over EpiPen Pricing1:32 A timeline of the Charlotte police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott3:36 Out of the Darkness3:52 Obama pledges support to? help? rebuild? flood-ravaged? southern Louisiana2:04 Five Ways to Help Protect Your Identity1:26 Hijacked Computer: What to Do1:38 Washington D.C. urges unity and reform after a week of violence1:57 Thousands of protesters in NYC respond to shootings by police0:44 PBS apologizes for Fourth of July broadcast1:01 Watch war veterans gather at Fresno airport for 10th Honor Flight1:29 Tiny golfer, big swing0:48 American flag etiquette with U.S. Marines1:38


Miami Beach waging a battle against sea level rise

As some streets flood from king tide events, Miami Beach launched an aggressive and expensive plan to combat the effects of sea level rise. The city will spend between $400 to $500 million over the next five years. (From March 15, 2016.)

Emily Michot
Miami Herald

Asked whether the United States has a plan for how to deal with rising seas, Ernesta Jones, a spokesperson for the Environmental Protection Agency, wrote in an email: “The short answer is no. There is no national program (or EPA program) or overall plan to decide what places will be protected using which techniques, or . . . decide which will not be protected.”

Levermann and others say that is a mistake, even if you aren’t a believer that global warming is a man-made phenomenon. They liken it to the idea of buying door locks, alarms and other anti-burglary defenses for a home. Nobody does this with definite knowledge that their home will be burglarized. Instead, these things are purchased and installed in the hopes that a home can avoid, or thwart, burglars.

“We can protect ourselves against sea level rise, if we aren’t stupid, if we don’t deny there is a problem and if we take this problem seriously,” Levermann says. “All coastal cities are threatened.”

But that doesn’t mean that any coastal cities are doomed. Half of the Netherlands exists below sea level. The nation has thrived for hundreds of years because of what the Dutch call “water defenses.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

Paul Olsen, a sea level expert at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, is running a program that’s looking at how the United States can adapt. He emphasizes that while the water is rising, there are options. Current U.S. strategies, he says, are “fledgling.”

“They don’t have the funding or the national attention that’s needed,” he says. “I don’t think we’re ignoring it. We’ve had other priorities. We’ve focused on terrorism, and al Qaida and ISIL (the Islamic State). These are the wolves that are closest to the sled. Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming.”

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

Olsen says there is no simple and one-size-fits-all solution to the problems that sea level rise will bring. There is no way the United States will be able to surround all of its cities with sea walls.

“The United States is just too big. There’s too much coastline,” he says. The U.S. has about 12,000 miles of ocean and sea coastline. By comparison, the Netherlands protects 270 miles of seacoast.

The American reality is that some cities will probably be sacrificed. Parts of cities certainly will be sacrificed.

Sea level rise? That wolf is a long ways away. But he is coming. Paul Olsen, Old Dominion University

“The U.S. coasts will look very different in 50 years,” Olsen says. “We’re going to have to learn to be like Venice, to learn to live with water.”

More land will be returned to wetlands, he predicts. Cities will move to higher ground and abandon neighborhoods in lowlands. People who elect to stay on the coast will have to adapt their homes for high water.

“You may have to defend a harbor, if a community relies on shipping or fishing. But do the fishermen need to live next to the harbor?” he says. “No. So maybe you defend the harbor and roads to that harbor, but you don’t have to save the neighborhoods in low-lying areas. If a community relies on the tourism attracted by its beaches, they may have to modify and save their beaches, and access to the beaches. But sacrifices will have to be made.”

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

The solution will rely on an overarching federal plan – one that does not yet exist – but also on local and state planning. Coastal cities, he believes, have four options: Defend, adapt, retreat and avoid.

“Defend” means sea walls, keeping the sea out. The Dutch approach. “Adapt” means creative thinking, raising buildings, raising neighborhoods, living with canals. This is Venice. “Retreat” is simply heading inland. Already, on a small scale, Alaskan Inuit tribes are employing this strategy. They don’t have the means to keep the sea at bay, so they take advantage of one of the great advantages of the United States, lots of higher ground. “Avoid” is simply making sure that new construction, roads, sewer and water systems are built with sea level rise in mind.

Incredible things are possible. Consider the lake surrounding Almere. It is a freshwater lake, separated from the North Sea by a 16-mile-long dike, one that was built into the sea. Elsewhere, Dutch water defenses include robotic dams that move into place only when needed, and that rise and fall with the water to protect the nation during storms. These defenses are the result of centuries of practice, and they have taken decades to plan and years to construct.

3,000 Number of years the Netherlands has been pushing back the sea

EDITORS: BEGIN OPTIONAL TRIM

While no plan exists in general for the United States, the federal government has been readying a plan for dealing with its own properties, according to Kate White, an Army Corp of Engineers civil engineer specializing in climate change issues. A plan for how the government should react to sea level rise is nearing completion.

Federal agencies for the past several years have been “assessing their own exposure to climate change, dealing with everything from the changes in snowmelt to sea level rise.” One precaution: The federal government no longer is building in floodplains.

Of 5,000 existing construction projects, reviewers determined that 1,400 were likely to be affected by sea level rise. Of those, they “determined 100 that were in high or very high impact zones. In a couple years, we will have recommendations from that list. At that point we will be able to say what is possible.”

She says that given the early stage of all such planning, she isn’t able to release a list of the projects, but the ways the risks will be dealt with will likely encompass a range of solutions: construction of sea walls and pumping systems, changes of policy and the incorporation of natural features, such as mangroves and coastal wetlands.

EDITORS: END OPTIONAL TRIM

To understand how completely a nation can commit to this sort of project, consider the Netherlands. The Dutch have been fighting to hold back the water since the end of the Iron Age, 3,000 years ago.

In the 1700s a wood-eating mollusk started destroying Dutch dikes at an astonishing rate, so the dikes were converted to stone and clay. Windmills churned night and day to pump out excess water. As land was recaptured, it became a patchwork of fertile fields and canals for drainage. It even fed the global image of the nation, most famously in Mary Mapes Dodge’s story of the Little Dutch Boy, who plugged a leaking dike with his finger.

That system held the nation together until 1953, when rising seas and flooding rivers led to bursting dikes and a flood that submerged half the country and left 1,800 dead.

The dikes were rebuilt, stronger and bigger. Today the Netherlands spends almost 0.2 percent of its annual economic output – about $1.1 billion – on what it calls “water defense.” Converting that to an equivalent American amount would be about $35 billion a year. For comparison, that’s about 6 percent of the 2015 U.S. defense budget of $560 billion.

Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants. We are entering an age where they are not. Ben Strauss, Climate Central

“What we, the Dutch, are doing is quite rational,” says Jarl Kind, a water economist for the Dutch Delta Commission, which oversees keeping the nation dry. “There are two ways to deal with the threat of floods: Wait for the floods and repair what is lost. Or build an infrastructure to mitigate flood damage. Given what we could lose, it’s not a lot of money to spend.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

The U.S. economy, of course, is much bigger – and the potential losses are, too. A 2014 report on the economic risks of sea level rise chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former U.S Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson Jr. warned that by 2050 as much as $106 billion worth of coastal property could be underwater. By 2100, flooding would have reclaimed another $507 billion worth of property, with another $730 billion in property under threat during high tides.

The U.S. Department of Commerce and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration put out a fact sheet saying U.S. businesses along the “coast produce 45 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product.” In 2015, for instance, that would have meant $8.3 trillion of production would have been in threatened areas.

“Our legal and political systems are built for a world in which sea levels and property and land are constants,” says Ben Strauss, vice president for sea level and climate impacts at Climate Central. “We are entering an age where they are not.”

In Almere, Gennil Dijkink, 60, explains that once climate change is accepted as reality– and there is no debate here – getting around to the business of adapting and living with the water only makes sense.

“My house is below the water level,” he says. “In fact, I’m only about a kilometer away from a dike. If it broke, I am dead. But I sleep very comfortably at night. We have a saying here: As the water rises, so must the dikes. It’s quite simple, really.”

EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE

Olsen, at Old Dominion University, thinks it won’t be long before sea level rise becomes a U.S. national priority. Too much is at stake for it to be put on a back burner for long. Unlike Levermann, he does not think Miami is lost. There’s too much at risk. Buildings will be lifted, neighborhoods will be walled, beaches will somehow be saved. Canals will crisscross the area.

“Miami will find a solution. I am confident of this,” he says. “I’m more worried about poorer, less organized coastal communities. Coastal cities are all at risk, and many won’t have the investment needed for creative solutions.”

Matthew Schofield: @mattschodcnews

Article source: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nation-world/national/article104917846.html


It’s that time of year again when community members will gather in Brooklyn for the 35th Annual 10K Community Bike Walk Run Oct. 9.

The Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation needs volunteers to join the effort. The organization is asking for friendly, polite and happy people to join them on the day of the race to help encourage participants, pass out water, help with the awards ceremonies and more. Everyone is welcome to participate.

Every year BSRC hosts this annual event to promote health in the community. From understanding preventable diseases to sharing time and space together with neighbors, the program is about unity within Brooklyn.

“As part of that goal, we are fostering community health and individual health and showcasing the neighborhood. Participants get to travel through the beautiful brownstone blocks,” said Tracey Capers of BSRC.

As one of the key event organizers for 10 years, Capers says the program has had a great impact on health awareness and community development over the years by adding different components to make it more inclusive.

This year, participants can bring their children for the kiddie run, and bikers of course are welcome to ride as well. Capers said the event’s expansion more holistically addresses the health disparities and issues the community faces.

Brooklyn’s adult population suffers from major health issues at a higher rate than the overall population of the city, including obesity, substance abuse and diabetes. According to the New York Department of Health, 27 percent of Brooklyn’s adult population is obese, as compared to 24 percent of the total city population. Even more troubling, 33 percent of Bed-Stuy’s adults are obese and suffering from preventable health issues.

Hundreds from all over the five boroughs and some from outside of New York are expected to race. Capers said it’s a great opportunity to see different parts of Brooklyn that many residents don’t have time to see. She also explained that many enjoy the run because of its unique way of incorporating community pride.

“We are providing residents an opportunity to come together to work on their health as a family. And we’ve arranged a fun-filled event. Something that’s special about our event is the community pride. It’s very distinct from other events. You’re seeing the flavor of the community,” Capers said.

For 50 years, BSRC has worked alongside the community in creating greater access to resources, assistance and more. The organization recently opened up a new facility that is the one-stop shop for family financial mobility. Residents can come in and get help creating a get-out-of-debt plan, learn how to acquire federal resources and more. One of the primary functions of the organization is restoring community access to resources and preserving affordable living while enabling families’ upward mobility.

To volunteer for the Bike Walk Run, email Tina Brooks at tbrooks@restorationplaza.org. Also visit the website for more information at www.restorationplaza.org.

Article source: http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2016/sep/29/bike-walk-run-needs-volunteers-annual-event-set-oc/