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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/25/arts/music/pop-rock-listings-for-april-25-may-1.html


It’s been a violent week in the capital city, with several shootings all within days of each other.

Lt. Hanlin of the Springfield Police Department says it’s normal for crime to increase when the weather breaks, but something is setting this year apart from others.

Detectives are saying they believe the rash of shootings that occurred over the last week are related. They believe there are links between the shooters and the victims, saying that “they definitely knew each other.”

“We do have some persons of interest,” Springfield Police Detective Ryan Irwin said. “We’re looking into the relationships, like I said before, between the suspects and the victims, and making some ties there.”

Police say they have not made any arrests yet. They tell us neighbors should not be worried, because they have increased patrols in the areas of these recent shootings.Police: Recent Springfield Shootings May be Related

Article source: http://www.wics.com/news/top-stories/stories/vid_16778.shtml



Apr 24 (Reuters) – For other related diaries, please
see;

DIARY – U.S. Federal Reserve

DIARY – European Central Bank

DIARY – Polling Unit Diary

DIARY – Today in Washington

DIARY – Key World Financial Events

DIARY – Political and General news

DIARY – Index of all Diaries

DIARY – economic data forecast

DIARY – Major Central Bank Events

** This Diary is filed daily **
———————————————————–

THURSDAY, APRIL 24

DETROIT, Unites States – U.S. Treasuty Secretary Jack Lew
visits Detroit, Michigan to highlight the Obama Administration’s
continued commitment to the city’s revitalization and explore
ways to promote job creation and economic growth.
PARIS – OECD publishes the economic survey report of
Netherlands – 1330 GMT.
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands – ECB President Mario Draghi gives a
keynote speech at the conference “De Nederlandsche Bank 200
years: central banking in the next two decades” organized by De
Nederlandsche Bank in Amsterdam – 0900 GMT.
STOCKHOLM – Swedish Riksbank will release the minutes of April
monetary policy meeting – 0730 GMT.
MADRID – ECB Vice President Vitor Constancio speaks at a
conference on Banking Union organized by Master in Banking and
Financial Regulation/Center for Banking Studies, University of
Navarra in Madrid – 1615 GMT.
SASKATOON, Canada – Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz
speaks to the Saskatchewan Trade and Export Partnership in
Saskatoon – 1845 GMT.
VANCOUVER, Canada – Canadian Finance Minister Joe Oliver speaks
at a luncheon hosted by the Vancouver Board of Trade in
Vancouver
WELLINGTON – Reserve Bank of New Zealand announces Official
Cash Rate (OCR) – 2100 GMT.

FRIDAY, APRIL 25

BERNE – Swiss National Bank (SNB) Chairman of Governing Board
Thomas Jordan and President Jean Studer speaks at the SNB’s
General Shareholders Meeting in Berne – 0800 GMT.
BOUVET ISLAND – Norway Finance Minister Siv Jensen and Norges
Central Bank Governor Oeysein Olsen speak at the parliamentary
committee about the 2013 funds performance – 0800 GMT.
AMSTERDAM – ECB Supervisory Chair Daniele Nouy speaks on
supervision at DNB conference on “Central banking in the next
two decades” in Amsterdam – 0830 GMT.
AMSTERDAM – Bank for International Settlements (BIS) General
Manager Jaime Caruana speaks at a conference in Amsterdam to
mark the 200th anniversary of the Dutch central bank – 1330 GMT.
CALGARY, Canada – Canadian Finance Minister Joe Oliver delivers
a speech to the Calgary chapter of the Economic Club of Canada -
1400 GMT.

MONDAY, APRIL 28

BONN, Germany – ECB President Mario Draghi speaks at the joint
conference of the coalition party groups of the German
government in Bonn, Germany – 1430 GMT.
FRANKFURT – ECB Executive Board members Vitor Constancio,
Benoit Coeure and Peter Praet speak at the conference “Financial
integration and stability in a new financial architecture”
jointly organized by the ECB and the European Commission in
Frankfurt, Germany.
NEW YORK – Former Federal Reserve chair Alan Greenspan speaks
before the Economic Club of New York.
PARIS – Bank of France Governor Christian Noyer holds news
conference on “The stakes for economic and monetary policy – the
situation in France and the euro zone” – 0800 GMT.

TUESDAY, APRIL 29

WASHINGTON – Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA)
Annual 2014 Washington Policy Summit (to May 2). Federal Reserve
Chair Janet Yellen speaks on the third day of the conference -
1230 GMT.
DUBLIN – Central Bank of Ireland Conference on “Macro to Micro
- A New Era in Financial Statistics”.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30

WASHINGTON – U.S. Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market
Committee (FOMC) announces decision on interest rates.
TOKYO – Bank of Japan monetary policy meeting.

MONDAY, MAY 05

BRUSSELS – Eurogroup meeting.

TUESDAY, MAY 06

BRUSSELS – Meeting of the Economic and Financial Affairs
Council (ECOFIN).
NEW YORK – Federal Reserve Board Governor Jeremy Stein speaks
before the Money Marketeers of New York University in New York.

SYDNEY – Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) holds interest rate
meeting.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 07

LONDON – Bank of England (BoE) holds Monetary Policy Committee
(MPC) meeting (to May 08).
TOKYO – Bank of Japan will release the minutes of April
monetary policy meeting – 2350 GMT.

—————————————————————

Enquiries to customer help desks — double click on
for telephone numbers.

E-mail: diaries@thomsonreuters.com

NOTE: The inclusion of diary items does not necessarily mean
that Reuters will file a story based on the event.

Article source: http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/04/24/diary-top-econ-idUKL3N0NG2ZM20140424


Claim this venue profile on eventful:

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Article source: http://amsterdam.eventful.com/venues/topsportcentrum-almere-/V0-001-002707953-8


The hunt for the perfect angle and light source will soon commence.

The 2014 Forgotten Coast Plein Air Paint Out will be held May 1-11 at various locales from Mexico Beach to Alligator Point.

More than 20 nationally acclaimed artists will gather to participate in the ninth annual Forgotten Coast Plein Air Invitational.

Painters from all over the world will set up their easels and pull out their brushes to document the landscape and culture of “Old Florida.”

A true plein air painting is done on location and captures the atmosphere of the moment. The majority of the painting must be completed on site with little to no work to be done in the studio.

Participating artists agree this is the true test of skill as it requires complete confidence in placement of color and brushwork in a short amount of time.

The annual event is coordinated by the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition, a non-profit organization established to produce regional multi-community events aimed to improve the quality of life for the coastal area.

The 10-day event will include five exhibits across the coast, daily art demonstrations, art sales, workshops where attendees can learn directly from the talent and a series of receptions where the public can meet and mingle with the artists.

The Wetroom, the central location where all paintings are hung after completion will be at the Center for History, Culture and Art in downtown Apalachicola.

Special events will include a student art day with handpicked students from Gulf and Franklin Counties who will work one-on-one with artists and a family art day, held on the final day of the Paint Out.

“We put together an event that covers 10 days but we hope that an event like student art day will linger with those students,” President of FCCC Leslie Fedota. “We hope it sets off a spark of creativity and serves as a catalyst for something bigger.

“It’s events like this one that nourish the community and spark vitality.”

Plein Air brings together the communities of Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Apalachicola, Eastpoint, St. George Island, Carrabelle, and Alligator Point to produce one of the largest art-focused events on the coast. The FCCC also receives support from the Gulf and Franklin County Tourist Development Councils, Mexico Beach Community Development Council and Visit Florida.

While most artists convene from all over the U.S. for the event, there’s one artist in particular that is guaranteed to win the “furthest distance traveled” award.

Leon Holmes, born and raised in Perth, Western Australia, will travel to the panhandle from Germany where he has been living for the past three years.

Holmes got his start in commercial art as an art director, graphic designer and illustrator and painted on the side as a hobby. As time went on, the painting took over and he dropped the commercial work in order focus on painting full time.

While traveling home after the Art in the Open event in Ireland, Holmes found himself speaking with Lori Putnam, regular participant in the Forgotten Coast Paint Out. Holmes said that Putnam spoke highly of the event and she put him in touch with the coordinators who, after reviewing his work, extended an invitation for 2014, which he happily accepted.

Holmes said that he’s known many of participating artists for years, but has only spoken with them via the Internet and is looking forward to meeting them face-to-face.

“There really is so much to look forward to,” said Holmes. “The people, the painting…I come from an old fishing port and sailing background, and I love painting old boats so the subject is going to be fantastic for me.”

Though this will be Holmes’ first time on the Forgotten Coast, he’s showcased at Plein Air events in Ireland, Holland and Poland and has held exhibitions in Amsterdam and New York City.

“All (of the events) have been different and wonderful in their own ways,” said Holmes. “You meet so many other painters, and nearly all are happy to share knowledge.”

Holmes said that due to the small living spaces in Europe, 99 percent of his work is done outdoors. He said that working in “plein air” to capture fleeting moments and time intensive paintings has become what he knows best.

“Plein Air is an international phenomenon that has grown over the last 10 years,” said Fedota. “It forces the artists to step outside a studio and simplify their tools…go back to the basics–the whole point is to capture a moment without all the exquisite detail.

“It’s a very simple concept that requires extraordinary expertise.”

As Plein Air Festivals become more popular around the globe and as the manpower required to put them on increases, Fedota said that she’s proud of the all-volunteer staff that makes the Forgotten Coast Paint Out a reality each year.

“It adds a lot of a heart,” said Fedota. “Volunteering is a thankless task but everyone involved has such a passion for the art and they see how the event benefits the communities.”

The full calendar of events along with participating artists can be viewed online at www.pleinairfl.com.

Article source: http://www.starfl.com/news/local-news/forgotten-coast-plein-air-paint-out-coming-next-week-1.309599


It’s not your usual exhibit. For one thing, it includes a 78-inch skull, a collection of teeth under glass, a 16th-century anatomy text, and a Civil War–era autopsy kit whose saws, chisels, and knives are remarkably similar to those used today.

“Body of Knowledge,” an exhibit about five centuries of anatomy and dissection, has been installed this spring on the Science Center’s second floor. It is partly eccentric (a poster of a kneeling skeleton), partly strange (the head cast of a hanged murderer), and also tech savvy: A digital gallery guide available for mobile devices is keyed to numbered icons in a 31-feature app. Armed with an average smartphone, a viewer can click and dig into extra layers of history and culture as she strolls among the pictures, instruments, old texts, and oddities under glass.

The app adds more of the weird and the wonderful. Icon 1 delves into initial-letter woodcuts in a Renaissance anatomy text. Busy groups of putti — cherubic boys representing medical students — act out the realities of human dissection as it once was. (Look for the panel on robbing a grave, a practice that one expert called a sign of “self-confident masculine culture of medical schools long ago.) Icon 31, meanwhile, jumps to the modern era with an essay — and images — on macabre cinema autopsies.

“The icons are launching points for extended context,” said Wheatland Curatorial Fellow Cira Louise Brown, who designed the digital gallery guide. “The idea was to give visitors another look.” She learned a lot creating it, including where the bodies to be dissected came from early on. They were both the “holy and cursed,” said Brown. They were criminals, women who died in childbirth, and even saints, whose bodies centuries ago were considered the repositories of sacred relics.

The first dissection in America, she added, happened in Hartford, Conn. It followed a witch trial and execution. Another dissected woman appears on the dramatic and seething frontispiece of a Renaissance anatomy classic from 1543, “De humani corporis fabrica,” by Andreas Vesalius. She is not a witch, but the disgraced mistress of a monk.

“We wanted a broad view of anatomy,” with pictures, artifacts, and texts that illuminate practices going back centuries, said co-curator Paolo Savoia, a third-year doctoral student in the History of Science program.

As for grave-robbing putti, teeth under glass, and giant wood pulp skulls: all teaching aids. “This is what we all do in our research,” said Savoia, who plans a dissertation on surgical and anatomy practices of the 15th and 16th centuries in his native Italy. “We look at how real people behave while doing science.”

“We” are the many experts who organized “Body of Knowledge,” sometimes in meetings of 20 or more. “We had never done a medicine exhibit,” said Jean-François Gauvin, Ph.D. ’08, director of administration for Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments. Joining the collections in sponsoring the exhibit (and supplying experts) were the Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Medical Library, Harvard Medical School’s Program in Medical Education, and the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture.

Closer to Savoia’s frame of reference, “we” also means his co-curators, also third-year doctoral students in the History of Science program and fellow contributors to the essay site Remedia. Cara Fallon will write her dissertation on longevity and life extension. Lisa Haushofer, already a medical doctor, is soon to be the go-to authority on the boundaries between food and medicine in Britain and the United States a century ago.

Most of the collaborating experts for the exhibit are scientists, so its organization has an internal logic. There are three main eras: the Renaissance, the Industrial Age of the 19th century, and the modern. There are three themes involving opening a body for study: preparation (even if it means robbing a grave), practice (cutting, peeling, revealing), and afterlife (the ways that the knowledge gained lives on).

The explanation can involve textbooks, art, photographs, preserved specimens, precise models, digital images, and even children’s games. (Remember Operation?)

Sara Schechner, the collection’s David P. Wheatland Curator, took a quick tour of the exhibit and pointed to a favorite display behind glass. “For beauty,” she said, “I like this corrosion cast of a lung.” The silvery, intricate object is the exact representation of the bronchi and trachea from an animal about 130 years ago. Corrosion casts, a teaching aid from the 17th century to the present, are made by injecting a substance into vascular spaces and other cavities, letting the substance harden — in this case bismuth, tin, lead, and cadmium — and then dissolving the modeled tissue.

Savoia was drawn to a facsimile tablet painted with religious scenes, a device used from the 14th century on to soothe condemned criminals as they were led to execution. (They were often later the subjects of dissection.) Held very close to the face of the condemned, he said, the devices allowed a criminal “to die a Christian death” and be distracted from the screams of the mob. “There were a lot of continuities between religious and medical practice,” said Savoia, which debunks the belief that the church was opposed to bodies being studied for science.

The executed criminals being studied that way were ideally from out of town, said Haushofer. That saved local families the shame of dissections, which were often public events and even spectacles, complete with tickets, music, and visiting dignitaries. More often, autopsies took place in wealthy private homes, and nearly always during winter. “Bodies,” she said, “don’t preserve well in the heat.”

Walking to one glass case, Haushofer was struck by the work of a 19th-century model-maker who crafted a painstakingly detailed representation of a stillborn child. It’s a powerful illustration, she said, “of the desire to make the moment of dissection last.”

As a favorite, Fallon settled on a 1544 example of “flap anatomy” — pop-up textbook depictions, layer by paper layer, of what’s inside a male and female body. “They’re rare, and they’re beautiful,” she said of the original pages, with text in German. “I love the way they bring together art and science.”

Brown, the app designer, had a lot of favorites, but chose a series of 19th-century photos hanging on one wall, showing medical students posing in dreamlike tableaux of autopsies, with themselves as client and practitioner. Gauvin said the pictures were a way of dealing with the “anxiety of dissection.” Brown agreed. “We’re still reconciling those anxieties,” she said, including with a modern debate over using just digital images to teach students. That’s not likely to change. Cadavers are increasingly seen as “an empathy tool” for medical students, said Haushofer, the medical doctor. “They actually refer to their cadavers as ‘patients.’ ”

All agreed that one part of the exhibit was a favorite: the reproduction of a 16th-century anatomical theater in Leiden, Netherlands. The dissector and the cadaver are in the center, with ascending rings of spectators beyond. “We wanted to play with the idea of being both a visitor and a spectator,” said Haushofer.

A visit might even prove inspiring. “I want to be dissected,” said Gauvin with a smile at the tour’s end, imagining the aftermath of a final moment long in the future. “I’m giving my body to Harvard.”

The exhibit, which is on the second floor of Harvard’s Science Center, runs through Dec. 5.

Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, including “The Body of Knowledge” exhibit, normally just open weekdays, is open the next two Saturdays: April 26, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., for the Cambridge Science Festival, and May 3, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., for the Harvard Arts First Festival.

Paulus is among Time 100


Article source: http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2014/04/body-exhibit/



Justin Bieber

The ‘Baby’ hitmaker visited the Yasakuni shrine, which is located in the country’s capital Tokyo and honours those who died in conflicts spanning from the Boshin War of 1868 to the end of World War II, earlier this week, but insists he did so unaware of what the monument stood for.

He wrote the message ”Thank you for your blessings,” alongside an image of himself at the site on Twitter – a post which has since been removed. This caused outrage since countries including China, South Korea, and Taiwan see the site as being unapologetic about the events of World War II and so Justin has reached out to fans.

He wrote: ”While in Japan I asked my driver to pull over for which I saw a beautiful shrine. I was mislead to think the shrines were only a place of prayer. To anyone I have offended I am extremely sorry. I love you China and I love you Japan.” Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang, is hoping the incident has helped Justin understand the importance of the historical relations between Chinese and Japanese.

He told the South China Morning Post newspaper: ”I don’t know the political stance of this Canadian singer, but China’s view on Japanese leaders visiting the Yasukuni Shrine is clear and consistent. ”I hope this singer can learn more about the history of Japanese militarism, and the wrongful historical and militaristic views promoted by the shrine after the visit.”

Justin previously caused outrage when for comments made during his visit to the Anne Frank Museum in Amsterdam and was arrested for driving under the influence in January.



Article source: http://www.sowetanlive.co.za/entertainment/2014/04/24/justin-bieber-reaches-out-to-angry-fans


Posted: Wednesday, April 23, 2014 7:00 pm

Noise will be monitored but DTC music events move forward in May as planned

By Cathy Benson | The Botetourt View

roanoke.com

After a number of residents near the Daleville Town Center complained of noise from the multiple musical events including Party in the Park at last month’s Board of Supervisors hearing, action was taken for the May events.


“Daleville Town Center wants to be a good neighbor,” said Todd Dodson of Amsterdam District, who had been inundated by calls and emails from residents.

After discussion, John Williamson of the Buchanan District suggested  the three May events  be monitored for noise levels and give the county a basis for noise mitigation to help area residents.

County Administrator Kathleen Guzi  spoke to noise mitigation and the three permits were approved with  bonds waived until the

Contact Cathy Benson at cathy.benson@botetourtview.com or 981-3140. 

on

Wednesday, April 23, 2014 7:00 pm.

Article source: http://www.roanoke.com/community/botetourt_view/noise-will-be-monitored-but-dtc-music-events-move-forward/article_d99dfd9a-ca54-11e3-a9b1-001a4bcf6878.html



April 24 (Reuters) – For other related diaries, please
see;

DIARY – U.S. Federal Reserve

DIARY – European Central Bank

DIARY – Polling Unit Diary

DIARY – Today in Washington

DIARY – Key World Financial Events

DIARY – Political and General news

DIARY – Index of all Diaries

DIARY – economic data forecast

DIARY – Major Central Bank Events

** This Diary is filed daily **
———————————————————–

THURSDAY, APRIL 24

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands – ECB President Mario Draghi gives a
keynote speech at the conference “De Nederlandsche Bank 200
years: central banking in the next two decades” organized by De
Nederlandsche Bank in Amsterdam – 0900 GMT.
STOCKHOLM – Swedish Riksbank will release the minutes of April
monetary policy meeting – 0730 GMT.
MADRID – ECB Vice President Vitor Constancio speaks at a
conference on Banking Union organized by Master in Banking and
Financial Regulation/Center for Banking Studies, University of
Navarra in Madrid – 1615 GMT.
SASKATOON, Canada – Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz
speaks to the Saskatchewan Trade and Export Partnership in
Saskatoon – 1845 GMT.
WELLINGTON – Reserve Bank of New Zealand announces Official
Cash Rate (OCR) – 2100 GMT.

FRIDAY, APRIL 25

BERNE – Swiss National Bank (SNB) Chairman of Governing Board
Thomas Jordan and President Jean Studer speaks at the SNB’s
General Shareholders Meeting in Berne – 0800 GMT.
BOUVET ISLAND – Norway Finance Minister Siv Jensen and Norges
Central Bank Governor Oeysein Olsen speak at the parliamentary
committee about the 2013 funds performance – 0800 GMT.
AMSTERDAM – ECB Supervisory Chair Daniele Nouy speaks on
supervision at DNB conference on “Central banking in the next
two decades” in Amsterdam – 0830 GMT.
AMSTERDAM – Bank for International Settlements (BIS) General
Manager Jaime Caruana speaks at a conference in Amsterdam to
mark the 200th anniversary of the Dutch central bank – 1330 GMT.
CALGARY, Canada – Canadian Finance Minister Joe Oliver delivers
a speech to the Calgary chapter of the Economic Club of Canada -
1400 GMT.

MONDAY, APRIL 28

BONN, Germany – ECB President Mario Draghi speaks at the joint
conference of the coalition party groups of the German
government in Bonn, Germany – 1430 GMT.
FRANKFURT – ECB Executive Board members Vitor Constancio,
Benoit Coeure and Peter Praet speak at the conference “Financial
integration and stability in a new financial architecture”
jointly organized by the ECB and the European Commission in
Frankfurt, Germany.
NEW YORK – Former Federal Reserve chair Alan Greenspan speaks
before the Economic Club of New York.
PARIS – Bank of France Governor Christian Noyer holds news
conference on “The stakes for economic and monetary policy – the
situation in France and the euro zone” – 0800 GMT.

TUESDAY, APRIL 29

WASHINGTON – Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA)
Annual 2014 Washington Policy Summit (to May 2). Federal Reserve
Chair Janet Yellen speaks on the third day of the conference -
1230 GMT.
DUBLIN – Central Bank of Ireland Conference on “Macro to Micro
- A New Era in Financial Statistics”.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30

WASHINGTON – U.S. Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market
Committee (FOMC) announces decision on interest rates.
TOKYO – Bank of Japan monetary policy meeting.

MONDAY, MAY 05

BRUSSELS – Eurogroup meeting.

TUESDAY, MAY 06

BRUSSELS – Meeting of the Economic and Financial Affairs
Council (ECOFIN).
NEW YORK – Federal Reserve Board Governor Jeremy Stein speaks
before the Money Marketeers of New York University in New York.

SYDNEY – Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) holds interest rate
meeting.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 07

LONDON – Bank of England (BoE) holds Monetary Policy Committee
(MPC) meeting (to May 08).
TOKYO – Bank of Japan will release the minutes of April
monetary policy meeting – 2350 GMT.

—————————————————————

Enquiries to customer help desks — double click on
for telephone numbers.

E-mail: diaries@thomsonreuters.com

NOTE: The inclusion of diary items does not necessarily mean
that Reuters will file a story based on the event.

Article source: http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/04/24/diary-top-econ-idUKL3N0NF4EC20140424


Klik Win acties

Doe mee en win! De laatste Klik Win acties van dé Weekkrant.

Fursten Forest: win mooie prijzenGratis De Oosterschelde tegemoetGratis De Oosterschelde tegemoetGratis De Oosterschelde tegemoetZaterdagnachtkoorts met Hans Stroeve en Ferry Maat

meer Klik Win acties »

Article source: http://www.deweekkrant.nl/artikel/2014/maart/27/keramiekmoment_diepenheim_2014