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The American Rental Association (ARA), represented by Christine Wehrman, ARA CEO, and Ken Hughes, publisher, Rental Management Group, was present and participated in the recent European Rental Association (ERA) convention and International Rental Exhibition held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 24-26.

Wehrman was a featured speaker at the ERA convention’s plenary session. Her presentation, “Trends in the U.S. Rental Industry,” spoke to the positive growth profile of the U.S. equipment rental industry through 2018. ERA’s Statistics Committee also presented market outlook and trends information for the European industry.

Wehrman addressed the secular shift to rental within the U.S. construction industry, which has led to increased rental penetration as measured by the ARA Equipment Rental Penetration Index™. Additional remarks focused on the potential for rental within the energy industry, trends within the U.S., and ARA’s continuing commitment to providing industry research and information.

“The ARA and ERA are collaborative partners within the Global Rental Alliance, along with rental associations in the countries of the United Kingdom, Australia, Brazil, Canada and New Zealand. We support one another’s associations and share information about industry trends and developments. ARA was pleased to be a part of the ERA convention and to further learn about the program work of the association,” Wehrman said. “It was enjoyable and beneficial to our learning.”

In addition, ARA was an exhibitor at the International Rental Exhibition, providing ARA an opportunity to interact with attendees at the ERA Convention and to meet with international and associate members of the association who were present. The exhibition also provided ARA an opportunity to promote The Rental Show 2015, scheduled for Feb. 22-25 in New Orleans, to an international audience.

As part of the events, ERA also presented its 2014 European Rental Awards during a dinner ceremony on June 25. The winners included:

  • Rental Marketing Campaign of the Year: Hewden, U.K.
  • Rental Safety Campaign of the Year: Ramirent, Finland.
  • Rental Product of the Year: Power Towers for the Pecolift access platform.
  • Rental Company of the Year (under €15 million): Hotmobil, Germany.
  • Rental Company of the Year (above €15 million): Loxam, France.
  • ERA/International Rental News Person of the Year: Gill Riley, founder and managing director, GGR Group.

Article source: http://www.rentalmanagementmag.com/Article/tabid/670/smid/1276/ArticleID/21174/reftab/685/t/Default.aspx


Stepping Out







Submitted photo
Hill-Stead Museum’s nationally-acclaimed Sunken Garden Poetry Festival will have its closing night of the 2014 season on Aug. 6 with poet, writer and teacher Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

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FARMINGTON Hill-Stead Museum’s nationally-acclaimed Sunken Garden Poetry Festival will have its closing night of the 2014 season on Aug. 6 with poet, writer and teacher Aimee Nezhukumatathil. Aug. 6 is also CT Young Poets Day at Hill-Stead, featuring readings from young poets from around the state, including the winners of Hill-Stead’s Fresh Voices Poetry Competition. Young poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 will also share their work. A schedule of events can be found below.

The Sunken Garden Poetry Festival is presented with generous support from Connecticut Humanities. Additional support comes from The Beekley Center for Breast Health Wellness at Bristol Hospital, Duncaster Retirement Community, SKY Investment Group, The Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, The Ellen Jeanne Goldfarb Memorial Charitable Trust, Travelers, the George A. and Grace L. Long Foundation, United Bank Foundation, Ensworth Foundation, and the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development.

Born to a Filipino mother and Malayali Indian father, Aimee Nezhukumatathil (neh-ZOO / koo-mah / tah-TILL) is the author of three books of poetry: Lucky Fish (2011), winner of the Hoffer Grand Prize for Prose and Independent Books; At the Drive-In Volcano (2007); and Miracle Fruit (2003), all on Tupelo Press. Lucky Fish won the gold medal in Poetry for the Independent Publishers Book Awards and was featured in the New York Times and on the PBS NewsHour ArtsBeat. Poems from this collection were also awarded an NEA Fellowship in poetry, the Glenna Luschia Prize from Prairie Schooner, and the Angoff Award from The Literary Review for the best poems appearing that volume year. At the Drive-In Volcano was named winner of the Balcones Prize, which honors an outstanding collection published the previous year. Her first collection of poetry, Miracle Fruit, was selected by Gregory Orr for the Tupelo Press Prize and was the winner of ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award in poetry, the Global Filipino Literary Award. Other awards for her writing include the Pushcart Prize, a poetry fellowship to the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and the Richard Hugo Prize from Poetry Northwest.

Poems and essays have appeared in American Poetry Review, Quarterly West, New England Review, Ploughshares, FIELD, Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Southern Review, and Tin House. Poems and essays have been widely anthologized in such venues as Billy Collins’ second edition of Random House’s Poetry 180: A Poem a Day and Language for a New Century: Contemporary Asian American Poetry from W.W. Norton. A number of essays and poems have also been published in several high school AP English textbooks and college textbooks.

Nezhukumatathil is a Professor of English at State University of New York-Fredonia where she was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal of Excellence and named the campus-wide Hagan Young Scholar. She has twice served as a faculty member for the Kundiman Asian American Poetry Retreat. Her books are widely adopted for high schools, colleges, and universities as part of contemporary poetry, women’s studies, and Asian-American literature classes; and she has been a featured reader at over a hundred venues all over the world—from places as varied as the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam, to being a headliner for the Dodge Poetry Festival, to UC-Berkeley, NYU, and reading for both the Poetry Society of America and The Academy of American Poets. She lives in western New York with her husband and two young sons.

CT Young Poets Day at Hill-Stead features readings from young poets from around the state, including the winners of Hill-Stead’s Fresh Voices Poetry Competition. Young poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 will also read.

The winners of the Fresh Voices Poetry Competition will read in the Sunken Garden from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Students from the other poetry organizations will read in the Makeshift Theater from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

I Giovani Solisti (The Young Soloists) is a honors chamber orchestra comprised of students from Conard and Hall High Schools in West Hartford, Connecticut. It was founded in 1983 with the intention of providing these students opportunities to perform great literature composed for string orchestra.

The group invites renowned soloists to perform with it and tours internationally. I Giovani Solisti’s international tours have taken the group to Canada, Ireland, England, France, Austria, and Italy, and the group made its Carnegie Hall debut in July, 1992. The group is active in its community, performing at schools, churches, and senior centers, as well as at miscellaneous receptions and events. In 2013, the group collaborated with Ballet Theatre Company (BTC) in a performance of Yarjuun, a piece centered around the experience of veterans from Iraq.

Gates open at 4 p.m. CT Young Poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 runs from 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the Makeshift Theater, followed by Fresh Voices Poetry Competition Winners: 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the Sunken Garden. I Giovani Solisti performs at 6:30 p.m. in the Sunken Garden, followed by Aimee Nezhukumatathil: 7:25 p.m. Continued…

  • 1
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Admission is $15 per person, ages 18 and under free. Parking is free.

Advance tickets for purchase ONLINE ONLY at hillstead.org. $10 per person. Please print out scannable ticket at home and bring to festival. Advance ticket purchases are non-refundable and are for sale up until 5 p.m. the day of the event.

Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating in and around the garden. Al fresco dining is allowed on the grounds. Participants are welcome to bring their own picnic suppers or purchase food/beverages on site.

Hill-Stead is noted for its 1901 33,000-square-foot house filled with art and antiques. Pioneering female architect Theodate Pope Riddle designed the grand house, set on 152 hilltop acres, to showcase the Impressionist masterpieces amassed by her father, Cleveland iron industrialist Alfred A. Pope. Hill-Stead is one of the nation’s few remaining representations of early-20th-century Country Place Estates. Collections include original furnishings, paintings by Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, James M. Whistler and Mary Cassatt, as well as numerous works on paper and Japanese woodblock prints. Stately trees, seasonal gardens, meadows, over three miles of stone walls and blazed hiking trails accent the grounds. A centerpiece of the property is the circa 1920 sunken garden designed by Beatrix Farrand, today the site of the renowned Sunken Garden Poetry Festival. The 1901 period rooms are open for tours Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. The last tour of the day begins at 3 pm. Grounds are open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. For tour and program information, browse www.hillstead.org or call 860.677.4787.

  • 1
  • 2
  • See Full Story

FARMINGTON Hill-Stead Museum’s nationally-acclaimed Sunken Garden Poetry Festival will have its closing night of the 2014 season on Aug. 6 with poet, writer and teacher Aimee Nezhukumatathil. Aug. 6 is also CT Young Poets Day at Hill-Stead, featuring readings from young poets from around the state, including the winners of Hill-Stead’s Fresh Voices Poetry Competition. Young poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 will also share their work. A schedule of events can be found below.

The Sunken Garden Poetry Festival is presented with generous support from Connecticut Humanities. Additional support comes from The Beekley Center for Breast Health Wellness at Bristol Hospital, Duncaster Retirement Community, SKY Investment Group, The Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, The Ellen Jeanne Goldfarb Memorial Charitable Trust, Travelers, the George A. and Grace L. Long Foundation, United Bank Foundation, Ensworth Foundation, and the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development.

Born to a Filipino mother and Malayali Indian father, Aimee Nezhukumatathil (neh-ZOO / koo-mah / tah-TILL) is the author of three books of poetry: Lucky Fish (2011), winner of the Hoffer Grand Prize for Prose and Independent Books; At the Drive-In Volcano (2007); and Miracle Fruit (2003), all on Tupelo Press. Lucky Fish won the gold medal in Poetry for the Independent Publishers Book Awards and was featured in the New York Times and on the PBS NewsHour ArtsBeat. Poems from this collection were also awarded an NEA Fellowship in poetry, the Glenna Luschia Prize from Prairie Schooner, and the Angoff Award from The Literary Review for the best poems appearing that volume year. At the Drive-In Volcano was named winner of the Balcones Prize, which honors an outstanding collection published the previous year. Her first collection of poetry, Miracle Fruit, was selected by Gregory Orr for the Tupelo Press Prize and was the winner of ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award in poetry, the Global Filipino Literary Award. Other awards for her writing include the Pushcart Prize, a poetry fellowship to the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Boatwright Prize from Shenandoah, and the Richard Hugo Prize from Poetry Northwest.

Poems and essays have appeared in American Poetry Review, Quarterly West, New England Review, Ploughshares, FIELD, Antioch Review, Prairie Schooner, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Southern Review, and Tin House. Poems and essays have been widely anthologized in such venues as Billy Collins’ second edition of Random House’s Poetry 180: A Poem a Day and Language for a New Century: Contemporary Asian American Poetry from W.W. Norton. A number of essays and poems have also been published in several high school AP English textbooks and college textbooks.

Nezhukumatathil is a Professor of English at State University of New York-Fredonia where she was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal of Excellence and named the campus-wide Hagan Young Scholar. She has twice served as a faculty member for the Kundiman Asian American Poetry Retreat. Her books are widely adopted for high schools, colleges, and universities as part of contemporary poetry, women’s studies, and Asian-American literature classes; and she has been a featured reader at over a hundred venues all over the world—from places as varied as the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam, to being a headliner for the Dodge Poetry Festival, to UC-Berkeley, NYU, and reading for both the Poetry Society of America and The Academy of American Poets. She lives in western New York with her husband and two young sons.

CT Young Poets Day at Hill-Stead features readings from young poets from around the state, including the winners of Hill-Stead’s Fresh Voices Poetry Competition. Young poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 will also read.

The winners of the Fresh Voices Poetry Competition will read in the Sunken Garden from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Students from the other poetry organizations will read in the Makeshift Theater from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

I Giovani Solisti (The Young Soloists) is a honors chamber orchestra comprised of students from Conard and Hall High Schools in West Hartford, Connecticut. It was founded in 1983 with the intention of providing these students opportunities to perform great literature composed for string orchestra.

The group invites renowned soloists to perform with it and tours internationally. I Giovani Solisti’s international tours have taken the group to Canada, Ireland, England, France, Austria, and Italy, and the group made its Carnegie Hall debut in July, 1992. The group is active in its community, performing at schools, churches, and senior centers, as well as at miscellaneous receptions and events. In 2013, the group collaborated with Ballet Theatre Company (BTC) in a performance of Yarjuun, a piece centered around the experience of veterans from Iraq.

Gates open at 4 p.m. CT Young Poets from CT Poetry Circuit, Poetry Out Loud, CT Young Writers Trust, CT Writing Project and OneWordCT National Youth Poetry Slam Team 2014 runs from 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the Makeshift Theater, followed by Fresh Voices Poetry Competition Winners: 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the Sunken Garden. I Giovani Solisti performs at 6:30 p.m. in the Sunken Garden, followed by Aimee Nezhukumatathil: 7:25 p.m.

Admission is $15 per person, ages 18 and under free. Parking is free.

Advance tickets for purchase ONLINE ONLY at hillstead.org. $10 per person. Please print out scannable ticket at home and bring to festival. Advance ticket purchases are non-refundable and are for sale up until 5 p.m. the day of the event.

Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating in and around the garden. Al fresco dining is allowed on the grounds. Participants are welcome to bring their own picnic suppers or purchase food/beverages on site.

Hill-Stead is noted for its 1901 33,000-square-foot house filled with art and antiques. Pioneering female architect Theodate Pope Riddle designed the grand house, set on 152 hilltop acres, to showcase the Impressionist masterpieces amassed by her father, Cleveland iron industrialist Alfred A. Pope. Hill-Stead is one of the nation’s few remaining representations of early-20th-century Country Place Estates. Collections include original furnishings, paintings by Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, James M. Whistler and Mary Cassatt, as well as numerous works on paper and Japanese woodblock prints. Stately trees, seasonal gardens, meadows, over three miles of stone walls and blazed hiking trails accent the grounds. A centerpiece of the property is the circa 1920 sunken garden designed by Beatrix Farrand, today the site of the renowned Sunken Garden Poetry Festival. The 1901 period rooms are open for tours Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. The last tour of the day begins at 3 pm. Grounds are open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. For tour and program information, browse www.hillstead.org or call 860.677.4787.

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Article source: http://www.westhartfordnews.com/articles/2014/07/30/entertainment/doc53ceb9782b9b6379707847.txt


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Article source: http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/tcs-official-it-consultancy-partner-for-singapore-marathon-14-114073001077_1.html


Britain may have just come out of the deepest recession in recent history, but there was a much more serious financial crisis 100 hundred years ago. To mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, the Bank of England has created an exhibition which shows how the little-known story of how the City of London almost went into financial meltdown on the eve of World War One.

Bank of England, c.1917

During the summer of 1914, investors became increasingly nervous as the politicial situation in Europe became more uncertain. This loss of confidence deepened into panic at the end of July as armies mobilised and war became inevitable.

Crowds gathered outside the Bank of England in the last week of July, as fearful investors scrambled to exchange their paper money for gold (back then Britain was on the Gold Standard, meaning for every pound in circulation, there was a pound’s worth of gold in the vaults of the Bank of England). The London Stock Exchange closed and lending by the banks began to dry up.

An extended bank holiday forced the markets to pause after several days of chaos and allowed banks to take stock. The notes in the prices book below show how normal routine was disrupted.

The left-hand page records attempts to meet demand for currency, such as shipping coin to the regions and issuing emergency £1 and 10 shilling notes to boost the money supply. The right-hand side, normally empty, forms a timeline of political events as Britain enters the war.

Curator Jennifer Adam explains: ‘There are two pages for a whole month in July. Normally the right hand side is blank but these pages show how normal business just collapsed. There was an ultimatum from Austria to Serbia, which was rejected. That’s when the events of the war began unfolding, creating uncertainty in the financial markets. As shown, the Bank’s interest rate jumped from 4% to 8% overnight.’

The London Stock Exchange closed early on Friday 31 July and remained closed for five months. In a bid to contain the crisis, banks kept their doors shut for several days after the bank holiday in early August 1914.

By the time the banks reopened on 7 August the initial panic had subsided, but Britain was officially at war.

One of the first problems to overcome was an impending credit crisis. After war had been declared, banks were left holding large amounts of IOUs from overseas borrowers which were unlikely to be repaid. These pre-war IOUs were purchased by the Bank of England and stored in its vaults in what came to be known as the ‘cold storage’ scheme. With the burden of toxic debt lifted, the banks were able to start lending again.

The financial panic led to the failure of a handful of stock market traders and a London bank. But the cold storage scheme, led by then-Bank of England Governor Walter Cunliffe, successfully kick-started lending by the banks and restored confidence in challenging times.

King George V and Queen Mary printing the first nomination war bond in the Bank’s printing department, c.1917. Image: Bank of England


The government borrowed immense sums of money in order to fund the war effort.

This included loans from allies such as the United States, but over the course of the war the government also borrowed billions of pounds directly from the British public through newly-created bonds. An extensive campaign appealed to members of the public – particularly those who did not join the armed forces – to invest in the War Loan as their patriotic duty.

Posters encouraged the public to invest in the War Loan as their patriotic duty, especially those who did not join the military forces. Image: Bank of England


The outbreak of war placed great pressure on Britain’s gold supply: the public tended to hoard gold sovereigns in times of uncertainty, but the government needed gold to finance the war effort.

On 7 August, just three days after war had been declared, H.M. Treasury began to issue £1 and 10 shilling notes as a way of supplementing the limited supply of gold coinage. The first notes were hurriedly produced: the lack of banknote paper available at such short notice meant they were printed on paper originally intended for postage stamps.

These emergency notes quickly became known as ‘Bradburys’, after the Secretary to the Treasury, Sir John Bradbury, whose signature they bore.


Hugh Carson Andrews joined the Bank in 1901. During the war he was a 3rd Class Clerk in the Drawing Office, where he remained to carry out vital – and secret – war work. He accompanied several shipments of gold from the Bank of England to Amsterdam, in order to support the Dutch Exchange, and to New York, to fund the expenses of war.

Absolute secrecy was essential because of the threat of German submarine attacks and the precious nature of the shipments. 

Andrews carried letters of introduction bearing samples of his signature, to prove his identity to the agents he met in Amsterdam and New York.

He spent the rest of his career at the Bank and retired in 1935, by which time he was Sub Agent of the Bank’s Plymouth Branch. No photographs of Andrews exist but pictured right is one of his missions.


Over the course of the war, the Bank’s staff expanded to cope with the administrative burden created by the War Loan.

By 1919, the number of women working at the Bank of England had risen to 2,463 out of a total of 4,000 staff, compared to 66 before the war. Women clerks were provided with lunch, tea, and even dinner if working late.

Women porters were given lighter duties than their male counterparts, but they still had to be fit and strong enough to carry out the work. Applicants had to pass a medical to qualify for the job. Neatness was essential for women porters, because their work involved carrying messages to other banks. They were given a special uniform [pictured right].

But there were strict rules of conduct, including an order against wearing patterned clothing. Gaiters protected the feet from rain during bad weather. The pink braid on the tri-corn hat matched the pink livery of existing male doorkeepers.

Image credit: Bank of England             

  


The United States Federal Reserve Bank and the Bank of England worked closely together to cope with the massive financial burden of the war. This telegram, sent from the Federal Reserve Bank to the Bank of England the day after the armistice, celebrates the end of the war. 

- Text and images courtesy of the Bank of England.

- The First World War and the Bank of England exhibition runs until March 2015. Find out more here.

Article source: http://www.managementtoday.co.uk/news/1305923/how-world-war-one-nearly-bankrupted-britain-bank-englands-role-ww1/


The Smart Building Conference – a joint venture of InfoComm International and CEDIA – is to expand significantly in the coming months with the staging of four events addressing some of Europe’s most energetic markets for audiovisual technology and systems integration.

Conference organiser Integrated Systems Events, the company responsible for the ISE trade show, has announced a schedule that will see the SBC stop off in London, Berlin and Milan this coming autumn, before returning to Amsterdam for ISE 2015 next February.

Mike Blackman, managing director, Integrated Systems Events, comments, “After successfully staging SBC events at the last two ISE shows and in London last October, we believe the time is right to roll out the Smart Building Conference brand across Europe. Our strategy will be for our three events this autumn to have local content tailored to each country’s regional market, while next year’s Amsterdam SBC will serve as the brand’s international meeting point.”

To this end, content for the SBC events in London, Berlin and Milan is being produced in close consultation with local partners in each country, while conference proceedings in the three cities will be conducted in English, German and Italian, respectively. As in previous years, the Amsterdam program will be conducted in English.

Content for all four events is being managed by Agata Pawlik, newly recruited conference manager at Integrated Systems Events. Fluent in four languages including German and Italian, Pawlik has over a decade of experience in B2B conference production in Europe, the Middle East and beyond.

Pawlik is to be supported by ISE’s international sales manager Elisabeth Kondakow, who will look after sponsorship sales, and by new recruit Ilona Jacobi, who will assist with marketing and logistics in addition to performing similar duties for the Amsterdam show.

Bob Snyder, editor-in-chief of Channel Media Europe and the moderator at all three SBC events so far, will continue in the role in London and Amsterdam, with local-market MCs being sought for Berlin and Milan.

The full SBC schedule and venue listing is:

  • Tuesday, October 7,2014 – Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
  • Thursday, November 6, 2014 – Mövenpick Hotel, Berlin
  • Tuesday, November 18, 2014 – nhow Hotel, Milan
  • Monday, February 9, 2015 – RAI, Amsterdam

The London, Berlin and Amsterdam events will both feature parallel tracks for residential and commercial building applications, with the first two also offering the option of full-day workshops at additional cost – the day after the SBC in London, the day before in Berlin. The Milan event takes place in the same week as the SIEC industry gathering at which both CEDIA and InfoComm are expected to offer additional industry training and networking opportunities.

“In all cases, the Smart Building Conference will focus on content of the highest quality and integrity, with best-practice presentations and panel discussions giving delegates the insight they need to make the most of the intelligent building revolution,” Blackman continues.

“Our venues have been carefully selected to offer a comfortable, businesslike environment in which speakers, partners, sponsors and delegates alike can enjoy networking and the exchange of information. With our joint-venture owners CEDIA and InfoComm International both contributing their expertise to the programme in all four of our locations, we are confident that the Smart Building Conference brand is set for a year of substantial growth.”

More information on the SBC 2014-15 schedule is available at: www.smartbuildingconference.com

Article source: http://www.cepro.com/article/cedia_infocomm_launch_4_new_european_smart_building_conference_events/


Carrie Hurihanganui, a general manager, said: “Due to the lengthy nature of
this disruption, the difficulty we’ve experienced in adequately
communicating with customers and the fact we have repeatedly let them down,
we have made the decision that in addition to our unreserved apology we will
also be compensating each customer $1,000 in either cash or Airpoints
Dollars.

“Due to an unfortunate combination of events this group of passengers has
travelled to Honolulu Airport on three occasions expecting to fly, however,
on each occasion the aircraft has been unable to depart because of a series
of evolving engineering issues.

“A part was required and we attempted to source a replacement within the US,
however, despite assurances, the right part was not supplied. Fortunately,
as a backup, we also loaded the part onto NZ10 from our Auckland Technical
Operations base this morning and this will arrive in Honolulu this evening.”

The flight was finally expected to leave at 7.30am, local time, on Tuesday.

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The Jamaican reggae legend Bunny Wailer is coming to Amsterdam with his band The Solomonic Reggaestra. On Thursday July 31st the band will perform in Paradiso. Bunny Wailer is 67 years old and the only living member of the original reggaeband The Wailers.

In 1963 Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer formed the group The Wailers. Bunny Wailer is often being called ‘the forgotten Wailer’, because according to many, he never got the credits he deserves. Together with Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer is one of the most important founders of reggae music.

Bunny Wailer has performed in Amsterdam only a few times in his life. The concert will be his first club show in Holland. Bunny Wailer and his band The Solomonic Reggaestra are known for their very long and energetic performances of at least 2 or 3 hours. So put on your dancing shoes and get ready!

BUNNY WAILER THE SOLOMONIC REGGAESTRA – Thu. 31 July 2014
Support-act: RAPHA PICO THE ROOTS ROCKERS
DJs: BLACK STAR SOUND / BACK-A-WALL MOVEMENT ft. MC JAHFORTH
Doors open 19:00 – Support-act 19:30 – Main act 20:30 – Afterparty till late!!
Entrance €31,50 + membership (3,50 p.m. / 25,- p.y.)
Pre-sale tickets via Ticketmaster!

Address: Paradiso
Weteringschans 6-8 – 1017 SG Amsterdam (Holland)

Article source: http://www.jamaicans.com/news/events/Bunny-Wailer-in-Amsterdam-July-31st-2014.shtml


Focus on best practice and delegate experience in London, Berlin, Milan and Amsterdam

The Smart Building Conference – a joint venture of InfoComm International and CEDIA – is to expand significantly in the coming months with the staging of four events addressing some of Europe’s most energetic markets for audiovisual technology and systems integration.

ISE 2015 Smart Building Conference

Conference organiser Integrated Systems Events, the company responsible for the globally acclaimed ISE trade show, has announced a schedule that will see the SBC stop off in London, Berlin and Milan this coming autumn, before returning to Amsterdam for ISE 2015 next February.

Mike Blackman, Managing Director, Integrated Systems Events, comments: “After successfully staging SBC events at the last two ISE shows and in London last October, we believe the time is right to roll out the Smart Building Conference brand across Europe. Our strategy will be for our three events this autumn to have local content tailored to each country’s regional market, while next year’s Amsterdam SBC will serve as the brand’s international meeting point.”

To this end, content for the SBC events in London, Berlin and Milan is being produced in close consultation with local partners in each country, while Conference proceedings in the three cities will be conducted in English, German and Italian, respectively. As in previous years, the Amsterdam programme will be conducted in English.

Content for all four events is being managed by Agata Pawlik, newly recruited Conference Manager at Integrated Systems Events. Fluent in four languages including German and Italian, Pawlik has over a decade of experience in B2B conference production in Europe, the Middle East and beyond.

Pawlik is to be supported by ISE’s International Sales Manager Elisabeth Kondakow, who will look after sponsorship sales, and by new recruit Ilona Jacobi, who will assist with marketing and logistics in addition to performing similar duties for the Amsterdam show.

Bob Snyder, Editor-in-Chief of Channel Media Europe and the moderator at all three SBC events so far, will continue in the role in London and Amsterdam, with local-market MCs being sought for Berlin and Milan.

The full SBC schedule and venue listing is as follows:

Tuesday 7 October 2014 – Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London
Thursday 6 November 2014 – Mövenpick Hotel, Berlin
Tuesday 18 November 2014 – nhow Hotel, Milan
Monday 9 February 2015 – RAI, Amsterdam

The London, Berlin and Amsterdam events will both feature parallel tracks for residential and commercial building applications, with the first two also offering the option of full-day workshops at additional cost – the day after the SBC in London, the day before in Berlin. The Milan event takes place in the same week as the SIEC industry gathering at which both CEDIA and InfoComm are expected to offer additional industry training and networking opportunities.

“In all cases, the Smart Building Conference will focus on content of the highest quality and integrity, with best-practice presentations and panel discussions giving delegates the insight they need to make the most of the intelligent building revolution,” Blackman continues.

“Our venues have been carefully selected to offer a comfortable, businesslike environment in which speakers, partners, sponsors and delegates alike can enjoy networking and the exchange of information. With our joint-venture owners CEDIA and InfoComm International both contributing their expertise to the programme in all four of our locations, we are confident that the Smart Building Conference brand is set for a year of substantial growth.”

More information on the SBC 2014-15 schedule is available at:

www.smartbuildingconference.com


Article source: http://knxtoday.com/2014/07/4611/smart-building-conference-brand-expands-with-events-in-london-berlin-milan-and-amsterdam-in-2014-15.html


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                            ‘Clean Hands’

Jeop Bertrams, The
Netherlands

[Click Here for More Jeop
Bertrams Cartoons]

 

 

MH17: West’s Version of Events Hearsay, Subterfuge, Hysteria (Izvestia, Russia)

 

“Given the area in which the plane crashed, it is logical
to assume that it was shot down. The only question is – who did it. … What is
in doubt? First, the dramatically altered course of the aircraft. Second, the
airline lost over the Indian Ocean in April, the fate of which remains unknown.
Third, the apparent desire of the Kiev authorities to ensure that such
incidents continue to happen. … . If Ukrainian authorities knew that the militia
had Buk missiles, then why they didn’t they close the combat zone to all flights?”

 

By Maxim Kononenko

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Translated By Egija Mierkalne

 

July 29, 2014

 

Russia
- Izvestia – Original Article (Russian)

Journalist Maxim
Kononenko – on what is known, and not known, about the shot down Malaysian
airliner.

 

On
July 17, a Boeing 777 aircraft belonging to Malaysia Airlines fell in the
Donetsk region, killing 298 people. The aircraft fell from a height of 30,000
feet, which can only have been for two reasons: an onboard explosion or
a missile strike.

 

Given
the area in which the plane crashed, it is logical to assume that it was shot
down. The only question is – who did it.

 

On
our planet, there are only two countries that have mistakenly shot down a
civilian airliner. These countries are Ukraine and the United States.

 

In
1988, the Americans shot down an Iran Airlines A300 over
the Persian Gulf (killing 290 people, including 66 children – video, right). In
2001, the Ukrainians shot down a Russian TU-154 [Siberia
Airlines Flight 1812
] over the Black Sea (66 people died). The Soviet Union
also shot down a civilian airliner [Korean Airlines Flight 007],
not, however, by mistake – but deliberately [Moscow claimed
the aircraft was on a spying mission
- video, right]. Nevertheless, the
1983 incident is also interesting in the context of what has happened in
Ukraine.

 

The
fact is that Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was
flying on a route different than it had before. On July 14th and 15th, it flew over
the Nikolaevsk and Kherson regions. On the 16th it flew a bit north – over the
Dnepropetrovsk and Zaporozhye regions. But on July 17th, the day of the disaster,
it for some reason, flew not only over the Donetsk region, but straight through
territory beyond Kiev’s control. The deviation (from what was likely the usual
course taken on July 14, 15 and before) was about 280 miles.

 

This
trouble is a reminder of South Korean Boeing KAL Flight 007, which also
deviated from its usual route, then by 300 miles. The relationship between the
USSR and the U.S. was considered to be in about the condition it is today. The
disaster only deepened the crisis, and who knows how it would have been resolved
if [General Secretary] Yuri
Andropov
hadn’t died just six months later.

 

So,
what is in doubt? First, the dramatically altered course of the aircraft.
Second, the airline lost over the Indian Ocean in April [MH370], the fate of
which remains unknown. Third, the apparent desire of the Kiev authorities to
ensure that such incidents continue to happen.

 

The
last point requires a more detailed explanation.

 

The
Malaysian airliner, flying at an altitude of 30,000 feet and at a speed of 660
miles per hour, could not have been shot down with the help of Igla MANPADS, which is what the
militias use to shoot down Ukrainian military aircraft. This can only be
done with more serious weapons. For example, with the help of “Buk” SAM missiles.
A lot of people use them. Ukraine, for example. In 2008, Georgians shot down one
of our Tu-22M tactical
reconnaissance aircraft with Ukrainian-supplied Buks.

 

Half
an hour before communications with MH17 were lost, Secretary Andrei Lysenko of Ukraine’s
National Security and Defense Council announced that the Donetsk militia had launched
a Buk missile. The news headlines from Ukrainian Pravda said: 5:26pm: NSDC Announces Launch of Buk Missile;
5:29 pm: Airliner Shot Down Over Donetsk
Region
.

 

The
fact is that suggestions of the militia’s use of Buk missiles didn’t appear on July
18th, or even July 19th. Reports that Ukrainian anti-aircraft
missile regiment A-1402 was overrun and looted by pro-Russian forces, and that Buk
missiles had been seized, first appeared on … June 29th! Why then, didn’t the
militiamen shoot down an aircraft at that height sooner? After all, they fly
there all the time!

 

The
fact that aircraft fly at that altitude all the time is another problem.
Ukrainian aviation authorities closed the combat zones to all flights, but only
up to a height of 26,000 feet. If Ukrainian authorities knew that the militia
had Buk  missiles, then why didn’t
they close the combat zone to all flights?

 

Almost
immediately after news broke about the plane crash, the Internet was filled
with statements. [Ukraine President] Poroshenko
declared the catastrophe a terrorist attack. Ministry of Internal Affairs adviser
Zorian Shkiryak urged NATO to launch a ground operation in the Donetsk region. Ukrainian
propaganda accounts on Twitter began to spread a false announcement from CNN
about the Pentagon’s confidence that the plane was shot down by a missile
launched from Russian territory.

 

Ludicrous
statements and assertions appeared that actually, they wanted to shoot down President
Putin’s plane, because that, too, has a tricolor on the fuselage. From the
ground, you know, stripes cannot be seen, but that the Boeing 777 had two
engines and the Presidential Il-96 has four, even a child knows. Not to mention
the fact that the presidential aircraft would have gone no place near the war
zone.

 

Instantly,
a supposed photograph of a baby lying in a field appeared (it looked more like
a doll), along with a passport of one of the passengers – brand new without any
trace of soot. And that was before the locals reached the site of the catastrophe.

 

Soon
later, on the YouTube account of the Ukraine Security Services, a recording appeared
[NYT video, right] of an intercepted conversation between militia leader Gorlovki Igor Bezler and
GRU [Main Intelligence Directorate] Lieutenant Vladimir Geranin. Bezler reports
to Geranin that a plane has been shot down. Journalist Ilya
Barabanov called colonel Geranin to ask him about this. He expressed great surprise, and said he never
discussed anything like that with Bezler.

 

The
recording was soon taken down and re-posted with another exchange, this one
between a man at the scene called “Major” and someone named “Greek.”
Major says that the plane was shot down by “Cossacks, based in Chernukhin.”
Let’s leave aside the Cossacks, who can deal with SAM Buk missiles, and concentrate
instead on the audio recording created on July 16th. That is, either it deals with
a different aircraft, or it was made before the fact in order to guarantee a
provocation.

Posted
By Worldmeets.US

 

Of
course, there are also questions from the other side, which mainly concern the
mysterious AN-26 transport plane allegedly shot down by militia about the same
time the Boeing fell. This is said to have been written on Igor Strelkov’s
Twitter account about an AN-26 that was never found, and the messages were subsequently
erased. And the fact remains, no one knows exactly who is behind this Twitter
account.

 

All
we know is that it doesn’t belong to Strekov.

 

http://carissaraman.com/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/52cbc_MH17-buk-broken-fixed_graphic.jpg

 

Yet
we do know that on July 13th, militia representative Ruslan Taskaev announced that
there was a problem with the Buk missiles that were captured (and Ukraine’s prosecutor
general announced that nothing was captured). And it is known that in the northwest
outskirts of Donetsk, battalions of Ukraine’s 156th Zenith Missile Regiment are
deployed, with 27 Buk M1 missile batteries. Well now, the
what, when, where, and how of who is to blame, is piling up.

 

SEE ALSO ON THIS:

Elsevier, The Netherlands:
MH17: Dutch Should Avoid America’s Post-911 Reaction

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
West’s Sliding Scale of Human Suffering is a Gift to Putin

Elsevier, The Netherlands:
As Dutch Mourn Our Dead, Russians Should Mourn their State

de Volkskrant, The Netherlands:
MH17: E.U. Must ‘Slam its Fists’ on the Table

Elsevier, The Netherlands:
Securing MH17 Victims: Dutch Have Elite Troops for a Reason!

de Volkskrant, The Netherlands:
MH17: Death Knell of Ukraine’s Pro-Russian Separatists

Guardian, U.K.:
MH17: Dutch Mayor Wants Putin’s Daughter Deported

Der Spiegel, Germany:
U.S. ‘Loses Patience’ with Europe: Wants Tough Russia Sanctions

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
Obama’s Sanctions on Russia are the ‘Only Real Sanctions’

Izvestia, Russia:
Abandoning Pro-Russia Separatists Would Be ‘Unforgivable’

Izvestia, Russia:
For Russia, Iraq Crisis is a ‘Lucky Break’

Newsweek Polska, Poland:
Has Putin Orchestrated Poland’s Eavesdropping Scandal?

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
Poland and Germany Show Kremlin No Wiggle Room

News, Switzerland:
All’s Disquiet on the Western Front

Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Germany:
U.S. ‘Unprepared’ for Opposition to TTIP Free Trade Deal

News, Switzerland:
Barack Macbeth’s ‘Murder’ of Net Neutrality

Die Welt, Germany:
NATO Badly Divided on Deploying Troops in East Europe; Facing Moscow

Ukrayinska Pravda, Ukraine:
In Defeating the ‘Russian Disease,’ Will Ukraine Lose its Soul?

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
Obama’s Chance to Make Up for Missteps Toward Poles

Direct Matin, France:
Mr. Obama’s D-Day Option: Indifference or Interference?

Economist, U.K.:
Poland – Obama’s First Stop in Europe

Latvijas Avize, Latvia:
In Latvia and Europe, Naive Hopes that Russia Will Change Live On

Izvestia, Russia:
‘Envy of the Gods’: Obama ‘Unfit to Lead’ a Great Power

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
Why Should Poland Thank Putin? Let Us Count the Ways

Le Figaro, France:
For Putin’s Russia, Conchita Wurst is a Tool Like No Other

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
New Space Race Will Benefit U.S. and Russian Programs

Vedemosti, Russia:
Russia Unmoved By NASA’s ‘Cancellation’ of Space Cooperation

Huanqiu, China:
China Requires Capacity to Shoot Down American Satellites

Epoca, Brazil:
China on the Moon: Move Over America and Russia

Rodong Sinmun, North Korea:
American Space Crime Must be Stopped!

Novaya Gazeta, Russia:
NATO ‘Never Promised’ Not to Expand Eastward

KPRU, RUSSIA:
Ukraine Crisis: Russia Cannot Dispense with the Dollar

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
Thank Putin for NATO’s ‘Second Wind’

Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Germany:
Weakening Russian Influence Requires European Energy Union

Gazeta, Russia:
Ukraine: Setting the Table for a Newer World Order

Izvestia, Russia:
Dimitry Kiselyov: Russia Takes West’s Place as Beacon of Free Expression

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Germany:
To Beat Putin, West Needs Armor, Not Empathy

Libero Quotidiano, Italy:
Obama ‘Turns the Nuclear Cheek’ To Vladimir Putin

Gazeta, Russia:
Russians Bid Farewell to the West

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
Lech Walesa: Europe ‘Cannot Count on the United States’

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
Obama’s Lesson: Poland Can’t Count on the United States

Huanqiu, China:
New Russia: Becoming the ‘Empire the World Needs’

Al Wehda, Syria:
Hagel Must Be Told: China is Not Russia

Semana, Colombia:
America and Russia: Two Empires Now ‘Nakedly Imperial’

Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia:
Ukraine and Syria: May Allah Make Russia’s Pain Severe!

Trouw, Netherlands:
Clinton’s Hitler-Putin Comment Highlights Weakness of E.U.

Vedomosti, Russia:
From Hitler to Putin: Crimea is ‘Not the First Time’

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
‘Annexing’ Crimea and ‘Uniting’ Jerusalem

Gazeta, Russia:
Annexing Crimea ‘Too Costly for Russia to Bear’

Vedomosti, Russia:
From Hitler to Putin: Crimea is ‘Not the First Time’

Izvestia, Russia:
Global Call to Arms Against ‘American Exceptionalism’

Moskovskij Komsomolets, Russia:
A Grateful Nation Cheers President Putin’s Triumph

Izvestia, Russia:
Crimea: ‘We Will Never Give Up What We’ve Won’

Handelsblad, Germany: ‘Fissures’ in Europe: Putin, Propaganda, and Patriotism

Der Spiegel, Germany: Finance Minister Schauble Says Putin Plan Reminiscent of Hitler

Der Spiegel, Germany:
The Sympathy
Problem – Is Germany a
Country of Russia Apologists?

Der Spiegel, Germany:
NATO’s Putin
Conundrum: Berlin
Considers Its NATO Options

La Stampa, Italy:
Ukraine: Putin Capitalizes on Western Identity Crisis

La Stampa, Italy:
Ukraine: Putin Capitalizes on Western Identity Crisis

de Volkskrant, Netherlands:
Putin’s Letter to Americans a Guilty Pleasure for the World

Huanqiu, China:

Letter By Vladimir Putin Exposes ‘Exceptional’ American Inequality

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
A ‘Puppet in Putin’s Hands,’ Snowden Paved Way to Ukraine Crisis

Diario De Noticias, Portugal:
Russia and America: United in Flouting International Law

Carta Maior, Brazil:
Venezuela and Ukraine: Upending Washington’s Best Laid Plans

Le Quotidien d’Oran, Algeria:
Crimea: The Latest Front for French Rambos

Reforma, Mexico:
Crimea and Texas: Russia’s Version of Manifest Destiny

Al Wehda, Syria:
America’s ‘Destiny’ of Invasion and Expansionism

FAZ, Germany:
America and Germany: The ‘Axis of Pragmatism’

BelTA, Belarus:
Lukashenko Warns: Crimea Sets ‘Dangerous Precedent’

Al-Madina, Saudi Arabia:
Ukraine and Syria: May Allah Make Russia’s Pain Severe!

tp24 Rubriche, Italy:
America ‘Too Young to Understand’ Crisis in Crimea

Die Zeit, Germany:
The Paler the West, the More Luminous Vladimir Putin

Rzeczpospolita, Poland:
Between Russia and the West: Ukraine’s Insurmountable Task

Huanqiu, China:
Crisis Over Ukraine Could Spell ‘Disaster’ for China

Asia Times, Hong Kong:
Beijing to Kiev to Taipei: Why
China Worries About Ukraine

Neatkariga Rita Avize, Latvia:
Putin Clears Western Minds of Intelligence, Media ‘Delusions’

Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Germany:
Germans Must Now Back Sanctions – Even if they Hurt Us

Diena, Latvia:
President Tells Lithuanians: Show Russia No Fear and be ‘Ready to Shoot’

de Volkskrant, The Netherlands:
Recognize Russia’s Legitimate Interests or Ukraine is Doomed

de Volkskrant, The Netherlands:
Most Crimeans Don’t want Ukraine Split

Frankfurter Rundschau, Germany:
Finding the Win-Win Scenario With Vladimir Putin

Sol, Portugal:
Ukraine May Awaken ‘Ghosts of the Great War’

de Morgan, Belgium:
Putin Knows: No One in West is Willing to Die for Sebastopol

Komsomolskaya Pravda, Russia:
Crimea: the Next Puerto Rico?

Russia Today, Russia:
VIDEOS: Roundup of Russian Reaction from Russia Today


European Press Agencies:

European Reaction to Developments in Ukraine

Moskovskii Komsomolets, Russia:
Report: U.S. to Help ‘Oust’ Black Sea Fleet from Crimea

Novosti, Russia:
Looking Toward the West, Ukraine ‘Lies’ to the East

Yezhednevniy Zhurnal, Russia:
Ossified Kremlin Misreads Biden Visit to Georgia, Ukraine

Rceczpospolita, Poland:
Banish All ‘Magical Thinking’ Regarding the Russian Bear

Kommersant, Russia:
The Kremlin Offers ‘an Ultimatum’ to America

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland:
‘Enormous Error’ of Bush’s ‘Georgian Protege’

Cotidianul, Romania:
Georgia Can ‘Kiss NATO Goodbye’


Financial Times Deutschland, Germany: Before Georgia – It is Europe that Needs Mediation


Rue 89, France: East Europe Best Not Depend on ‘Obsolete’ NATO


Liberation, France: Russian President ‘Dictates His Peace’ to Hapless Europe

Le Figaro, France: Between America and Russia, the E.U. is On the Front Line

Le Figaro, France: War in the Caucasus: Georgia ‘Doesn? Stand a Chance’


Le Figaro, France: A Way Out of the Georgia Crisis for Russia and the West


Le Figaro, France: A Way Out of the Georgia Crisis for Russia and the West


Frankfurter Rundschau, Germany: Did Russia ‘Win’ the Georgia Crisis? Not By a Long Shot

 

CLICK HERE FOR
RUSSIAN VERSION

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Posted By
Worldmeets.US July 29, 2014, 10:29pm

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.worldmeets.us/izvestia000057.shtml


GLENS FALLS – Darin Williams was early in his eight-year term as the owner of the Glens Falls Golden Eagles, “wide-eyed,” with no baseball experience to help guide him.

What he knew was the possibilities. If he didn’t know them already, Tommy John — known more for his namesake surgery than his Major League career — made sure he did.

“He was saying that Glens Falls was a hot bed for baseball,” Williams said. “You had (Dave) Palmer, (Randy) St. Clair and (Dave) LaPoint all pitching in the major leagues, and you had a Double-A team here. Glens Falls used to be a hot bed for baseball: why isn’t it anymore?”

Williams leaves some of his goals for the team on the table as he hopes to finalize an agreement to sell the Golden Eagles to Ben Bernard of Granville, but did accomplish what he first set out for.

“My main thing when I first got this was I wanted baseball here,” Williams said. “Did I have a business plan, did I have an entrance strategy, an exit strategy? No. To me, going into this, I was like a Little League coach where the Little League was dying and I didn’t want it to die, so I jumped in. Of course, this is a lot bigger than a Little League park and all of that.

“I didn’t want a Brendan Harris playing for Amsterdam,” Williams added. “I like the idea of Ben Brown being on the team, a local kid, and all of the other local kids, the Siena kids we’ve had come up and the Skidmore kids we’ve had in the past. Mike Harrington being here.”

The business side of the operation plagued Williams, forcing the franchise into financial struggles in recent years. Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League president Jeff Kunion confirmed that the league’s board of directors gave Williams until Tuesday to pay debts he owes to the league, but would not comment on if those debts were paid. Bernard said he believed a plan was in the works to take care of that debt.

Kunion said in the event of the debts going unpaid, the league taking over operations of the team — and therefore the sale — was an option, but declined to explain other options. Williams said the league will not take control of the team.

“I’m not a really good person with the business side of it,” Williams said. “That’s what is hard for me to provide here, because of a lack of experience, just like any other business. I’ve enjoyed my time here. I’ve had a great eight years. I love it.”

Williams has confidence that Bernard can fix any business-related problems and create a positive atmosphere around the team.

“I know with Ben involved, he can get it in the black and go farther,” Williams said. “There are people that want to get involved, but it’s just reaching them.”

Bernard hopes to get more people involved, both in the running of the team and in supporting the team.

“First of all, just to get the businesses we need behind us to support us. That will get people out here at East Field. I think we have to fulfil a lot of obligations and get the kids at this ballpark,” Bernard said. “That’s my main goal: family entertainment and have the businesses happy that they’re affiliated with us.

“First thing is we have an obstacle. We have to get with the city, because there are things that have to be done. The lease is up (with East Field),” Bernard added. “We’ve got to find a way to cut costs. I feel like we can help that way and I’m sure we can work with the city and help put this together.”

Bernard said negotiations will not begin until August 31, but did mention the Eagles taking on some financial responsibility for facility upkeep and lighting as an option to cut costs for the city.

“They’ve basically told me that handling the lights and doing all of the lawns, there’s a heavy expense there. They’re into $70,000, $80,000 a year, and we’ve got to figure out how to cut that down,” Bernard said. “If we took on the facility ourselves, we could book the high school games — there’s a lot of legwork that goes into all that. I’m kind of speaking out there a little bit, but I’m sure that’s a direction the city would want to take.”

Bernard said he would hope to get more high school events played at East Field and hopefully move into other sports playing in the facility, including soccer and lacrosse.

Other immediate changes in the organization could include a name change for the Golden Eagles.

“We’re looking at it as something we could do,” Bernard said. “If we do, it will be for the only reason of creating something different and getting more to the kids. Minor league baseball has done it big-time, in changing names and tying into the heritage of an area.”

Article source: http://poststar.com/sports/eagles-changing-hands/article_66c4ff56-179f-11e4-ac7c-0019bb2963f4.html