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(WKF)
Written by the World Karate Federation

On 11th and 12th of October 2014, the Grand Final event of the Karate1 – Premier League season 2014 will take place in Salzburg Wals-Siezenheim (Austria). Only three weeks before the World Senior Karate Championships in Bremen, the Salzburg Open will announce the Grand Winners of this year and will outline some favorites for Bremen in each category. Grand Winners are not only the best athletes of their categories but above all, the most consistent athletes all along the year, as competitors earn ranking points in each one of the 8 WKF Karate1 events during 2014, namely Paris (January), Almere (March), Lasko (March), Jakarta (June), Okinawa (August), Istanbul (September), Hanau (September) and Salzburg (October). Grand Winners are designated in all individual official categories, both in kumite and kata disciplines.

The WKF Karate1 Premier League (WPL) is the prime league event in the world of Karate. It is a series of world class Karate competitions recognized and supported by the World Karate Federation. Its aim is to bring together the best Karate competitors in the world in a series of open championships of unprecedented scale and quality. In addition to the World Championships, which are biennial events, the WPL provide a platform for staging world Karate events on a regular basis and thus enhances interest of the public and the media, both nationally and worldwide.

This last Premier League of year 2014 will gather 595 competitors from 52 countries, mostly from Europe, where national teams will refine their preparation for the World Championships of Bremen (5-9 November). National teams of Belarus, Belgium, Czech Republic, Croatia, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Israel, Serbia, Finland, Netherlands, Luxemburg, Azerbaijan, Poland, Russia, Switzerland, Spain, Ukraine, Austria but also Peru will take part in the event, which promises to be outstanding, with athletes wanting to make a mark on everyone’s minds, especially on their opponent.

Programme:

Saturday, 11th October 2014

09.00h Eliminations and Repechage

• Kata individual female Seniors
• Kata Team male Seniors
• Kumite individual female -50 kg, -68 kg
• Kumite individual male -67 kg, -75 kg, -84kg

20.00h Finals and awards ceremony

Sunday, 12th of October 2014

09.00h Eliminations and Repechage

• Kata individual male Seniors
• Kata Team female Seniors
• Kumite individual female -55 kg, -61 kg, +68 kg
• Kumite individual male -60 kg, +84kg
• Finals and awards ceremony

Ranking before the Salzburg Grand Final

Kata Female: Hoang Ngan NGUYEN, Vietnam, 986 pts
(2nd Terryana D’ONOFRIO, Italy, 814 pts)

-50 Kg: Serap OZCELIK, Turkey, 1112 pts
(2nd Alexandra RECCHIA, France, 896 pts)

-55 Kg: Miyi KOBAYASHI, Japan, 1652 pts
(2nd Tuba YAKAN, Turkey, 952 pts)

-61 Kg: Anita SEROGINA , Ukraine, 926 pts
(2nd Lucie IGNACE, France, 536 pts)

-68 Kg: Pegah ZANGENEH KARKOOTI, Iran, 902 pts
(2nd Sonia FROMAGER, France, 664 pts)

+68Kg: Nadège AIT IBRAHIM, France 848 pts
(2nd Meltem HOCAOGLU, Turkey, 656 pts)

Kata Male: Vu Duc Minh DACK, France, 1192 pts
(2nd Issei SHIMBARA, Japan, 1042 pts)

-60 Kg: Luca MARESCA, Italy, 1096 pts
(2nd Amir MAHDI ZADEH, Iran, 944 pts)

- 67 Kg: Dome SZEGEDI, Hungary, 910 pts
(2nd Gianluca DE VIVO, Italy, 688 pts)

-75 Kg: Stanislav HORUNA, Ukraine, 1278 pts
(2nd Serkan YAGCI, Turkey, 1240 pts)

-84 Kg: Georgios TZANOS, Greece, 832 pts
(2nd Aykhan MAMAYEV, Azerbaijan, 816 pts)

+84 Kg: Enes ERKAN, Turkey, 1144 pts
(2nd Iman SANCHOOLI, Iran, 822 pts)

Homepage Photo: Getty Images

Written by the World Karate Federation

For general comments or questions, click here.

20 Years at #1: Your best source of news about the Olympics is AroundTheRings.com, for subscribers only.

Article source: http://www.aroundtherings.com/site/A__48673/Title__Karate-1---Grand-Final-Salzburg-11-12-October-2014/292/Articles


(WKF)
Written by the World Karate Federation

On 11th and 12th of October 2014, the Grand Final event of the Karate1 – Premier League season 2014 will take place in Salzburg Wals-Siezenheim (Austria). Only three weeks before the World Senior Karate Championships in Bremen, the Salzburg Open will announce the Grand Winners of this year and will outline some favorites for Bremen in each category. Grand Winners are not only the best athletes of their categories but above all, the most consistent athletes all along the year, as competitors earn ranking points in each one of the 8 WKF Karate1 events during 2014, namely Paris (January), Almere (March), Lasko (March), Jakarta (June), Okinawa (August), Istanbul (September), Hanau (September) and Salzburg (October). Grand Winners are designated in all individual official categories, both in kumite and kata disciplines.

The WKF Karate1 Premier League (WPL) is the prime league event in the world of Karate. It is a series of world class Karate competitions recognized and supported by the World Karate Federation. Its aim is to bring together the best Karate competitors in the world in a series of open championships of unprecedented scale and quality. In addition to the World Championships, which are biennial events, the WPL provide a platform for staging world Karate events on a regular basis and thus enhances interest of the public and the media, both nationally and worldwide.

This last Premier League of year 2014 will gather 595 competitors from 52 countries, mostly from Europe, where national teams will refine their preparation for the World Championships of Bremen (5-9 November). National teams of Belarus, Belgium, Czech Republic, Croatia, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Israel, Serbia, Finland, Netherlands, Luxemburg, Azerbaijan, Poland, Russia, Switzerland, Spain, Ukraine, Austria but also Peru will take part in the event, which promises to be outstanding, with athletes wanting to make a mark on everyone’s minds, especially on their opponent.

Programme:

Saturday, 11th October 2014

09.00h Eliminations and Repechage

• Kata individual female Seniors
• Kata Team male Seniors
• Kumite individual female -50 kg, -68 kg
• Kumite individual male -67 kg, -75 kg, -84kg

20.00h Finals and awards ceremony

Sunday, 12th of October 2014

09.00h Eliminations and Repechage

• Kata individual male Seniors
• Kata Team female Seniors
• Kumite individual female -55 kg, -61 kg, +68 kg
• Kumite individual male -60 kg, +84kg
• Finals and awards ceremony

Ranking before the Salzburg Grand Final

Kata Female: Hoang Ngan NGUYEN, Vietnam, 986 pts
(2nd Terryana D’ONOFRIO, Italy, 814 pts)

-50 Kg: Serap OZCELIK, Turkey, 1112 pts
(2nd Alexandra RECCHIA, France, 896 pts)

-55 Kg: Miyi KOBAYASHI, Japan, 1652 pts
(2nd Tuba YAKAN, Turkey, 952 pts)

-61 Kg: Anita SEROGINA , Ukraine, 926 pts
(2nd Lucie IGNACE, France, 536 pts)

-68 Kg: Pegah ZANGENEH KARKOOTI, Iran, 902 pts
(2nd Sonia FROMAGER, France, 664 pts)

+68Kg: Nadège AIT IBRAHIM, France 848 pts
(2nd Meltem HOCAOGLU, Turkey, 656 pts)

Kata Male: Vu Duc Minh DACK, France, 1192 pts
(2nd Issei SHIMBARA, Japan, 1042 pts)

-60 Kg: Luca MARESCA, Italy, 1096 pts
(2nd Amir MAHDI ZADEH, Iran, 944 pts)

- 67 Kg: Dome SZEGEDI, Hungary, 910 pts
(2nd Gianluca DE VIVO, Italy, 688 pts)

-75 Kg: Stanislav HORUNA, Ukraine, 1278 pts
(2nd Serkan YAGCI, Turkey, 1240 pts)

-84 Kg: Georgios TZANOS, Greece, 832 pts
(2nd Aykhan MAMAYEV, Azerbaijan, 816 pts)

+84 Kg: Enes ERKAN, Turkey, 1144 pts
(2nd Iman SANCHOOLI, Iran, 822 pts)

Homepage Photo: Getty Images

Written by the World Karate Federation

For general comments or questions, click here.

20 Years at #1: Your best source of news about the Olympics is AroundTheRings.com, for subscribers only.

Article source: http://www.aroundtherings.com/site/A__48673/Title__Karate-1---Grand-Final-Salzburg-11-12-October-2014/292/Articles


The Dutch have always been bold. Not just any culture would make wooden shoes a thing and turn tulip bulbs into a luxury investment. And if you like New York City, you can thank New Amsterdam.

Now Holland wants to be a colonial power again, this time on Mars. The “Mars One” project, announced in 2012, wants to establish the first human colony on the Red Planet by 2025. It’s a one-way trip but there is no shortage of people willing to be one of the four that will build the first human settlement in space. 

Mars One claims that the entire mission can be built upon technologies that already exist – that is bold, since America has NASA and President Obama canceled the Constellation program started by his predecessor, President George W. Bush, because he did not even believe NASA could go back to the moon

Engineers at MIT say skeptics are probably right – and they didn’t even have to build a thing to be critical. Their simulation says new technologies will be needed to keep humans alive on Mars. 


Mars One plans to establish the first human settlement on Mars by 2025. In this artist’s rendering of a series of habitats, solar panels (in the foreground), would supply the colony’s electricity, while a system to extract water from the soil (in the background) would supply drinking water. Courtesy of Bryan Versteeg/Mars One

For example, if all food is obtained from locally grown crops, as Mars One envisions, the vegetation would produce unsafe levels of oxygen, which would set off a series of events that would eventually cause human inhabitants to suffocate. To avoid this scenario, a system to remove excess oxygen would have to be implemented — a technology that has not yet been developed for use in space.

Similarly, the Mars Phoenix lander discovered evidence of ice on the Martian surface in 2008, suggesting that future settlers might be able to melt ice for drinking water — another Mars One goal. But according to the MIT analysis, current technologies designed to “bake” water from soil are not yet ready for deployment, particularly in space.

The team also performed an integrated analysis of spare-parts resupply — how many spare parts would have to be delivered to a Martian colony at each opportunity to keep it going. The researchers found that as the colony grows, spare parts would quickly dominate future deliveries to Mars, making up as much as 62 percent of payloads from Earth.

As for the actual voyage to Mars, the team also calculated the number of rockets required to establish the first four settlers and subsequent crews on the planet, as well as the journey’s cost.

According to the Mars One plan, six Falcon Heavy rockets would be required to send up initial supplies, before the astronauts’ arrival. But the MIT assessment found that number to be “overly optimistic”: The team determined that the needed supplies would instead require 15 Falcon Heavy rockets. The transportation cost for this leg of the mission alone, combined with the astronauts’ launch, would be $4.5 billion — a cost that would grow with additional crews and supplies to Mars. The researchers say this estimate does not include the cost of developing and purchasing equipment for the mission, which would further increase the overall cost.

Olivier de Weck, an MIT professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems, says the prospect of building a human settlement on Mars is an exciting one. To make this goal a reality, however, will require innovations in a number of technologies and a rigorous systems perspective, he says.

“We’re not saying, black and white, Mars One is infeasible,” de Weck says. “But we do think it’s not really feasible under the assumptions they’ve made. We’re pointing to technologies that could be helpful to invest in with high priority, to move them along the feasibility path.”

“One of the great insights we were able to get was just how hard it is to pull this [mission] off,” says graduate student Sydney Do. “There are just so many unknowns. And to give anyone confidence that they’re going to get there and stay alive — there’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.”

Do and de Weck presented their analysis this month at the International Astronautical Congress in Toronto. Co-authors include MIT graduate students Koki Ho, Andrew Owens, and Samuel Schreiner.


Simulating a day on Mars


The group took a systems-based approach in analyzing the Mars One mission, first assessing various aspects of the mission’s architecture, such as its habitat, life-support systems, spare-parts requirements, and transportation logistics, then looking at how each component contributes to the whole system.

For the habitat portion, Do simulated the day-to-day life of a Mars colonist. Based on the typical work schedule, activity levels, and metabolic rates of astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS), Do estimated that a settler would have to consume about 3,040 calories daily to stay alive and healthy on Mars. He then determined crops that would provide a reasonably balanced diet, including beans, lettuce, peanuts, potatoes, and rice.

Do calculated that producing enough of these crops to sustain astronauts over the long term would require about 200 square meters of growing area, compared with Mars One’s estimate of 50 square meters. If, as the project plans, crops are cultivated within the settlers’ habitat, Do found that they would produce unsafe levels of oxygen that would exceed fire safety thresholds, requiring continuous introduction of nitrogen to reduce the oxygen level. Over time, this would deplete nitrogen tanks, leaving the habitat without a gas to compensate for leaks.

As the air inside the habitat continued to leak, the total atmospheric pressure would drop, creating an oppressive environment that would suffocate the first settler within an estimated 68 days.

Possible solutions, Do says, might include either developing a technology to extract excess oxygen or isolating the crops in a separate greenhouse. The team even considered using nitrogen extracted from the Martian atmosphere, but found that doing so would require a prohibitively large system. Surprisingly, the cheapest option found was to supply all the food required from Earth.

“We found carrying food is always cheaper than growing it locally,” Do says. “On Mars, you need lighting and watering systems, and for lighting, we found it requires 875 LED systems, which fail over time. So you need to provide spare parts for that, making the initial system heavier.”


Twisting the knobs


As the team found, spare parts, over time, would substantially inflate the cost of initial and future missions to Mars. Owens, who assessed the resupply of spare parts, based his analysis on reliability data derived from NASA repair logs for given components on the ISS.

“The ISS is based on the idea that if something breaks, you can call home and get a new part quickly,” says Owens. “If you want a spare part on Mars, you have to send it when a launch window is open, every 26 months, and then wait 180 days for it to get there. If you could make spares in-situ, that would be a massive savings.”

Owens points to technologies such as 3-D printing, which may enable settlers to manufacture spare parts on Mars. But the technology as it exists today is not advanced enough to reproduce the exact dimensions and functions of many space-rated parts. The MIT analysis found that 3-D printers will have to improve by leaps, or else the entire Mars settlement infrastructure will have to be redesigned so that its parts can be printed with existing technology.

While this analysis may make the Mars One program look daunting, the researchers say the settlement-analysis tool they’ve developed may help determine the feasibility of various scenarios. For example, rather than sending crews on one-way trips to the planet, what would the overall mission cost be if crews were occasionally replaced?

“Mars One is a pretty radical idea,” Schreiner says. “Now we’ve built a tool that we can play around with, and we can twist some of the knobs to see how the cost and feasibility of the mission changes.”

Article source: http://www.science20.com/news_articles/new_amsterdam_on_mars_is_bold_but_is_it_feasible-146911


LONDON (AP) — There are few artists with a more famous face than Rembrandt. The Dutch master painted himself repeatedly throughout his career.

Four large self-portraits gaze at visitors entering a mammoth new Rembrandt show at the National Gallery in London. He looks by turns quizzical, stoic and defiant, and the exhibition seeks to show that even this best-known of artists was a man of surprising facets.

“Rembrandt: The Late Works” covers the 20 years before Rembrandt’s death in 1669, aged 63. It was a time of personal upheaval. Despite his renown as an artist, he struggled with debt and faced bankruptcy. His common-law wife, Hendrickje Stoffels, and his son, Titus, both predeceased him.

And yet, said curator Betsy Wieseman, it was a period of intense creativity.

“I think he was very good at compartmentalizing,” Wieseman said Tuesday at a preview for the show. “His art was certainly affected by these dramatic events in his life, but I think the art was also an escape for him, and a therapy in a way.”

Organized with Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum — it travels there in February after its London run — the exhibition includes more than 90 paintings, drawings and prints from collections around the world.

One key painting almost didn’t make it.

“The Conspiracy of the Batavians Under Claudius Civilis” belongs to Sweden’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts and has not left Sweden in 45 years.

“The loan was only secured a couple of weeks ago,” Wieseman said. “It’s just absolutely crucial to the show and it really, really was a dramatic, last-minute Hail Mary pass.”

The painting is a survivor of a mysterious episode in Rembrandt’s career. It’s part of a huge work depicting a tribal uprising against the Romans. For the 17th-century Dutch, the episode symbolized their liberation from Spanish rule.

The work was commissioned for Amsterdam’s grand new Town Hall, but was displayed for only a few months before being removed. The reason is unknown; it’s possible the work’s intensity was too much for the burghers of Amsterdam.

As the exhibition illustrates, Rembrandt could be unflinching — there’s blood and brains galore in “The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Joan Deyman” — but also tenderness, in delicate nudes and quiet, intimate portraits of the artist’s son.

The works on show embrace a vast array of techniques and moods. There are experiments with light and shadow; delicate drawings of Dutch forests and farms; large portraits of society worthies; scenes from mythology and the Bible.

But it’s the faces that linger in the memory.

Elderly merchant’s wife Magaretha de Geer looks like a woman not to be trifled with in Rembrandt’s portrait of her. Vanity, seriousness and detached amusement seem to flit across the faces of “The Sampling Officials of the Amsterdam Drapers’ Guild.”

Fashion designer Zandra Rhodes — subject of a Rembrandt-style portrait by photographer Rankin for a project that accompanies the exhibition — said it was the depth of Rembrandt’s images that set him apart.

“In his early life he’s like all the other Dutch painters,” she said. “And then his work gets very, very intense.”

“It’s a bit serious for me to own,” she added. “I’d rather have a Rubens.”

“Rembrandt: The Late Works” is at the National Gallery from Wednesday to Jan. 18, and at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam from Feb. 12 to May 17, 2015.

Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/14/rembrandt-the-late-works_n_5985016.html?utm_hp_ref=arts




Ajay Jayaram Captures Maiden Badminton Grand Prix Title


Ranked as high as 21 earlier this year, Ajay Jayaram’s ranking had plummeted to 66 as he had to give up six precious months of his career to recover from surgery that he underwent in February. Slowly but surely , Ajay made his come back count.  Ajay Jayaram capped his comeback from surgery with a memorable win at the USD 50,000 Dutch Open at Almere.

ajayjayaram

Ajay Jayaram with the Dutch Open trophy

The Bangalore-based 27-year-old defeated Indonesia’s Ihsan Maulana Mustofa 10-11, 11-6, 11-7, 1-11, 11-9 to bag his biggest title and first Grand Prix title overall.

Ajay who is under the tutelage of Tom John had claimed three international career titles before this win – the New Zealand Open which he won in 2009, the Thailand Open in 2010 and the Czech Open last year. But this victory will perhaps be the sweetest for him as it bolstered his self-belief after going through a tough time physically.

Playing with Confidence After Surgery

This was only Ajay Jayaram’s fourth international tournament since his return from surgery that took place in February. Slowly but surely , Ajay has made his come back count. and needless to say his stamina and fighting spirit is back.

Ajay Jayaram concurred, ‘’This is the first tournament that I’ve played with complete confidence after the surgery. I could feel the shoulder opening up a lot more and I won many points with my smashes’’.

This triumph is also significant as it makes him the first Indian to win a tournament in the new 11×5 scoring system.

5×11 scoring system

Since the last scoring system change in 2006 which saw the implementation of the highly successful 21×3 system, the Badminton World Federation (BWF) is looking at changing the scoring system once again. It was decided in June that the BWF will test the five-game scoring system August onwards at Level 3 and 4 tournaments including the Grand Prix events. ‘’The 5×11 scoring system is aimed at creating more excitement and interest while reducing the time it takes for matches to be completed,’’ BWF President Poul-Erik Høyer said.

Ajay Jayaram’s Progress At Dutch Open

The tournament was extremely hard-fought. Ajay posted some big confidence-boosting wins to reach the Final. He defeated third-seed Dionysius Hayom Rumbaka of Indonesia in the quarter-finals. In the semi-finals, Ajay Jayaram posted a massive straight-game win (11-8 11-7 11-5) over the top seed Rajiv Ouseph of England.

In the final Ajay Jayaram was up against a promising determined 18 year old Indonesian Ihsan Maulana Mustofa.

Ajay lost a close battle in the first game of the final, but stormed back to take the next two games. The fourth game was surprisingly one-sided and it went in the Indonesian’s favour. At this stage one would have thought that the younger 18 year old Indonesian held the edge . But Ajay displayed great fighting skills to edge past Mustofa in the fifth and final game to clinch the title.

Indian Badminton Doing Well

Here’s hoping Ajay Jayaram can continue his comeback in the same vein. As for Indian badminton, this win is good news for it highlights the depth of our Men’s team as even Parupalli Kashyap and HS Prannoy have bagged International titles in recent times


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Article source: http://sportsrediscovered.com/3533/ajay-jayaram-captures-maiden-badminton-grand-prix-title


LONDON There are few artists with a more famous face than Rembrandt. The Dutch master painted himself repeatedly throughout his career.

Four large self-portraits gaze at visitors entering a mammoth new Rembrandt show at the National Gallery in London. He looks by turns quizzical, stoic and defiant, and the exhibition seeks to show that even this best-known of artists was a man of surprising facets.

“Rembrandt: The Late Works” covers the 20 years before Rembrandt’s death in 1669, aged 63. It was a time of personal upheaval. Despite his renown as an artist, he struggled with debt and faced bankruptcy. His common-law wife, Hendrickje Stoffels, and his son, Titus, both predeceased him.

And yet, said curator Betsy Wieseman, it was a period of intense creativity.

“I think he was very good at compartmentalizing,” Wieseman said Tuesday at a preview for the show. “His art was certainly affected by these dramatic events in his life, but I think the art was also an escape for him, and a therapy in a way.”

Organized with Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum — it travels there in February after its London run — the exhibition includes more than 90 paintings, drawings and prints from collections around the world.

One key painting almost didn’t make it.

“The Conspiracy of the Batavians Under Claudius Civilis” belongs to Sweden’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts and has not left Sweden in 45 years.

“The loan was only secured a couple of weeks ago,” Wieseman said. “It’s just absolutely crucial to the show and it really, really was a dramatic, last-minute Hail Mary pass.”

The painting is a survivor of a mysterious episode in Rembrandt’s career. It’s part of a huge work depicting a tribal uprising against the Romans. For the 17th-century Dutch, the episode symbolized their liberation from Spanish rule.

The work was commissioned for Amsterdam’s grand new Town Hall, but was displayed for only a few months before being removed. The reason is unknown; it’s possible the work’s intensity was too much for the burghers of Amsterdam.

As the exhibition illustrates, Rembrandt could be unflinching — there’s blood and brains galore in “The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Joan Deyman” — but also tenderness, in delicate nudes and quiet, intimate portraits of the artist’s son.

The works on show embrace a vast array of techniques and moods. There are experiments with light and shadow; delicate drawings of Dutch forests and farms; large portraits of society worthies; scenes from mythology and the Bible.

But it’s the faces that linger in the memory.

Elderly merchant’s wife Magaretha de Geer looks like a woman not to be trifled with in Rembrandt’s portrait of her. Vanity, seriousness and detached amusement seem to flit across the faces of “The Sampling Officials of the Amsterdam Drapers’ Guild.”

Fashion designer Zandra Rhodes — subject of a Rembrandt-style portrait by photographer Rankin for a project that accompanies the exhibition — said it was the depth of Rembrandt’s images that set him apart.

“In his early life he’s like all the other Dutch painters,” she said. “And then his work gets very, very intense.”

“It’s a bit serious for me to own,” she added. “I’d rather have a Rubens.”

“Rembrandt: The Late Works” is at the National Gallery from Wednesday to Jan. 18, and at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam from Feb. 12 to May 17, 2015.

Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

Article source: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/10/14/5241156/london-show-celebrates-aging-but.html


SuperYacht Company, publishers of SuperYacht Times, will again host their annual network event on 19 November 2014 during the METS. The network event has been rebranded SuperYacht Night Amsterdam. Holland Yachting Group has recently joined SuperYacht Night Amsterdam as the main sponsor.

Holland Yachting Group fosters international trade and strengthens the competitive position of the Dutch Yachting Industry on the world market by uniting a group of carefully selected companies situated in the Netherlands. They undertake a number of activities in order to promote its members’ products and services and thus strengthen their position on the global market.

SuperYacht Night Amsterdam is by invitation only, and will be open free of charge to captains, senior crew, shipyards, designers, project managers and all our clients.

The event is made possible by Holland Yacht Group (main sponsor), Pon Power (product sponsor), and Diana Yacht Design, Lift Emotion, LaVie Systems, and Van Berge Henegouwen as event sponsors.

To apply for tickets, please visit the Superyacht Night Amsterdam website.

Article source: http://www.superyachttimes.com/editorial/56/article/id/13179


The nineteenth edition of the Amsterdam Dance Event (ADE) will take place from the 15th to 19th of October 2014. Over the last three years the world’s leading event for electronic music has almost doubled in size, and ADE’s organizers are confident of maintaining above average year on year growth rates for the foreseeable future. At the 2014 edition, the organization expects 350,000 visitors from around the world.

The record breaking 2013 edition of the ADE focused on the 25th anniversary of dance music in the Netherlands, which was marked by a number of special events including the launch of the book Mary Go Wild, an outdoor exhibition, talk shows, special music events and several film screenings. The anniversary celebrations resulted in a wave of national and international media attention and emphasized the leading role that the Netherlands plays in the global dance music industry. In total 2,156 artists from around the world performed in 80 different venues at ADE 2013.

“The success of ADE and the health of the electronic music sector are inextricably linked,” says ADE director Richard Zijlma. “Dance music is currently in the process of conquering the world, with more and more countries and industries getting involved. Consequently ADE has become a global knowledge and business platform that the world, and the Netherlands and Amsterdam in particular, all benefit from. It’s not for nothing that dance music is now an important part of the cultural policy of the Dutch government.”

ABOUT ADE
In the past eighteen years ADE has grown into a globally renowned platform for the international dance and electronic music scene. The festival is the perfect place to spot the latest musical trends and emerging talents, as well as hear the most recent work of both electronic music pioneers and current superstar acts. In addition to the extensive live line-up of ADE Festival, ADE Playground offers music enthusiasts a large and varied daytime program including exhibitions, in store promotions, pop-up stores and film screenings, in locations all over the city center. The business arm of the event (ADE Conference) is recognized as the most important of its kind, presenting a broad range of conferences and networking opportunities that focus on music and technology, VJs visuals, sustainability, harder dance styles, new talent and the education of students.

ADE_Post1 ADE_Post3 ADE_Post2 ADE_Post4

Article source: http://flicmagazine.com/mag/en/2014/10/amsterdam-dance-event/


HRABOVE, Ukraine – A child’s jump rope, its yellow handles blistered and charred. A burned book in Tagalog. Chunks of twisted fuselage. More than seven weeks after being shot from the sky, the wreckage from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 still lay strewn Tuesday across the fields of eastern Ukraine.

As evidence of the July 17 aviation disaster that killed all 298 people on board remained exposed to the elements, investigators hundreds of miles away in the Netherlands — who have not yet visited the crash site because it is deemed too dangerous — released a preliminary report that left key questions unanswered.

The plane had no mechanical or other technical problem in the seconds before it broke up in the sky after being struck by multiple “high-energy objects from outside the aircraft,” the report said.

There were multiple punctures in the cockpit and front section of the fuselage, it said — damage that could be caused by a missile that detonates in front of its target and peppers it with small chunks of metal. However, investigators did not identify the source of the fragments or say who fired them.

Although the report drew no conclusions about responsibility, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said the findings were consistent with “our original assessment, that it was likely shot down by one of these surface-to-air missiles fired from separatist-controlled territory in eastern Ukraine.”

“I’m unaware of other objects or ways that it could be brought down that are consistent with that finding,” Harf said of the report. “It highlights questions for which Russia must still answer.”

The slow pace of the inquiry, its cautious preliminary conclusion and the fact that wreckage and human remains are still lying in Ukraine frustrated and angered victims’ families.

“Well, I don’t know what to say about this,” said Samira Calehr, a Dutch mother who lost two sons, 11-year-old Miguel and 19-year-old Shaka, in the crash.

She said that she wants the people responsible for downing the plane brought to justice “as soon as possible,” pausing for emphasis on every word. “I want to know who killed my children.”

Zenaida Ecal, a 53-year-old resident of Pagbilao in the northeastern Philippines who lost her best friend, Irene Gunawan, expressed frustration that the report discloses only what many already knew — that the Malaysian plane came under fire — but fails to identify the perpetrators.

“We just want all of the victims to be found, identified and given a proper burial. We want the perpetrators to be identified and punished. As long as these don’t happen, all the families and friends of the victims will continue to suffer,” Ecal said. “It’s taking so long.”

A separate Dutch-led criminal investigation is underway aimed at bringing the perpetrators to justice.

Tjibbe Joustra, chairman of the Dutch Safety Board that is leading the international investigation, acknowledged the preliminary report — mandated by international aviation guidelines — did not shed much new light on the downing of the Boeing 777.

“Perhaps you could say we are a little bit behind, but we are not behind with the truth. We try to make a report that’s for the next of kin — very important — but also for history,” he said.

“I understand a lot of people say, ‘Why don’t they work a little quicker?’ But this will take its time,” he added.

Governments whose citizens died on Flight 17 were left in little doubt about what happened.

“The findings are consistent with the government’s statement that MH17 was shot down by a large surface-to-air missile,” Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in a statement.

Christopher Yates, an aviation safety specialist at Yates Consulting, told The Associated Press the report “is extremely consistent with damage from a missile for the simple reason there are penetration marks.

“It must have been moving at very high velocity to create the damage,” he said. “It could only be a missile of the type that would reach the altitude that would have struck the aircraft — potentially a BUK missile.”

The Dutch report came a day after the BBC’s “Panorama” show cited residents who said they saw a BUK M-1 missile being offloaded in a town in eastern Ukraine, near the place seen in photos released by the Ukrainian army that showed a BUK launcher heading east. They said that the crew handling it had Russian accents.

The report added to a growing body of evidence that pro-Russian rebels were involved.

Just three hours before the plane was shot down above rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine, the AP reported on the passage of a BUK M-1 missile system — a machine the size of a tank bearing four ground-to-air missiles — through the rebel-held town of Snizhne near the crash site.

A highly placed rebel officer told the AP in an interview after the disaster that the plane was shot down by a mixed team of rebels and Russian military personnel who believed they were targeting a Ukrainian military plane. Intercepted phone conversations between the rebels released by the Ukrainian government support that version of events.

In those tapes, the first rebels to reach the scene can be heard swearing when they see the number of bodies and the insignia of Malaysia Airlines.

Nearly two months later, those insignia and other poignant reminders of the 298 lost lives are still scattered around the crash site.

Samira Calehr said she was disappointed with the pace of progress.

“I think that if this had happened to citizens of the United States, they would make a faster move than here,” she said. “Because I think — I’m so sorry for saying it like this — I think the Dutch government, they are safe players. They don’t want to have an issue.”

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said the head of a mission to bring back human remains and belongings would travel to Ukraine on Wednesday. But the region is still deemed to unsafe for the Dutch Safety Board staff.

Shelling continued overnight in eastern Ukraine despite a cease-fire, injuring one woman, the city council of Donetsk said.

The council for the rebel-held stronghold said a school and several residential buildings were hit by shelling, imperiling the already shaky cease-fire between pro-Russian rebels and Ukrainian forces.

Col. Andriy Lysenko, spokesman for the Ukrainian National Security and Defence Council, told journalists Tuesday that five servicemen had been killed and 33 wounded since the cease-fire was declared on Friday.

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Corder reported from The Hague, Netherlands. Associated Press writers Matthew Lee in Washington, Toby Sterling in Almere, Netherlands, and Jim Gomez in Manila contributed to this report.

© Copyright 2014

Article source: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/world/flight-17-wreckage-still-lies-in-ukraine-fields-as-dutch-report-says-it-was-hit-in-midair-1.1348773


ROTTERDAM, Netherlands – Seven weeks after Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was blown out of the sky above Ukraine, Bryce Fredriksz and Daisy Oehlers’ bedroom is still a mess.

The room, with its mural of palm trees, unmade bed and a table cluttered with clothes and books, is a constant reminder to Bryce’s parents Silene and Rob Fredriksz of the unbearable loss of their 23-year-old son and his 20-year-old girlfriend.

“I cleaned it last week, but the mess is staying there as it is,” Silene says. The room, Rob says, still “breathes” Bryce and Daisy.

Memories and those reminders are all they have.

Experts working to identify remains found at the crash scene have still found no trace of the young couple, who were heading to a vacation in Bali to help Daisy get over the death this year of her mother.

There are still more than 100 families living in a similar limbo. Only 193 of the 298 passengers and crew on board the plane when it was shot down July 17 have been positively identified, according to the last count released by Dutch officials. Dutch investigators may go some way to confirming what happened to the flight when they publish a preliminary report into the disaster on Tuesday, though they won’t apportion blame.

The plane was shot down above an area held by pro-Russian separatists. Attempts to recover bodies were called off Aug. 6 due to fighting between rebels and Ukrainian forces nearby.

As days and weeks have passed, whatever hope Silene and Rob had clung to in the aftermath of the disaster has ebbed away.

“In the beginning we were hoping to get complete bodies, but that hope is gone,” Silene says. “My hope is that we get body parts from both of them not just from one. I’d rather have none than only from one.”

Time is not healing the parents’ wounds, especially with no closure.

“I still can’t accept what happened,” Silene says. “The grief, the pain, the tears are more, bigger, than in the beginning.”

Rob is retired. Silene, a management assistant, has not been back to work since their son and his girlfriend were killed.

Friends and family drop by regularly to their row house on the outskirts of Rotterdam. Sometimes they can laugh when talking about their feelings, but grief is never far away.

“In the morning you wake up, stand up, and then the tears come. First thing in the morning I cry,” Silene says, tears welling.

An issue that looms large for all is what will become of the wreckage — and any remains — still at the crash site in eastern Ukraine.

“There are still belongings from all the passengers in the fields,” Silene says. “We think there still might be body parts because they haven’t searched everywhere yet. And who is to blame? That is the question.”

Silene says she and Rob want to visit the crash site when it is deemed safe enough. Right now, that’s as close as they have to visiting Bryce and Daisy’s final resting place.

“If we have a complete body it’s different. But we will not have a complete body so there will be body parts still left in Ukrainian fields. So that’s their grave.”

Silene wonders if even that kind of contact — were she ever to get it — would help.

Not having their bodies “makes it maybe a bit more difficult,” she says. “But I don’t think I would be any less unhappy if I had their bodies.”

Other families have gotten an element of closure with the return of the bodies of loved ones.

The family of two brothers, Miguel Panduwinata, 11, and Shaka Panduwinata, 19, who also were on their way to a holiday in Bali on board Flight 17, received their remains this week.

The brothers, whose bodies were identified about 10 days after the crash, were cremated last week and the family held a wake in their honour.

Shaka and Miguel’s family were able to see the boys’ coffins, touch their bodies and place some of their favourite belongings inside their caskets.

The corpses were wrapped “so you can’t see the remains, but you can touch them and feel them,” Harun says. He says the boys’ mother Samira and their 16-year old brother Mika and grandmother Yasmine all felt that was important. “Hugging them … that gave them some closure. It gave some relief.”

“It sounds bizarre, but in the big scheme of things, we’re very grateful that the bodies were, mostly, intact,” says the boys’ uncle, Harun Calehr. “And that they were recovered. I mean, there are so many families that are still waiting in vain.”

___

Sterling reported from Almere, Netherlands.

© Copyright Times Colonist

Article source: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/no-body-means-no-end-in-sight-to-grief-of-parents-who-lost-son-and-his-girlfriend-on-flight-17-1.1347700