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Almere (Dutch pronunciation: [??.?m??.r?] ( listen)) is a planned city and municipality in the province of Flevoland, the Netherlands, bordering Lelystad and Zeewolde. The municipality of Almere comprises the districts Almere Stad, Almere Haven, Almere Buiten, Almere Hout, Almere Poort (under construction) and Almere Pampus (design phase).

Almere is the youngest city in the Netherlands: the first house was finished in 1976, and Almere became a municipality in 1984. It is the largest municipality in Flevoland with 191,495 citizens (9 May 2011), and the 7th largest in the Netherlands. In October 2007, the city council of Almere made agreements with the government to expand the city to 350,000 inhabitants by 2030.

The original plans for the IJsselmeerpolders saw the land being used for agriculture. However, after World War II housing was needed for the rapidly growing population of Amsterdam and two towns were planned in the polders Oostelijk Flevoland and Zuidelijk Flevoland. The town in Oostelijk Flevoland became Lelystad. The town in Zuidelijk Flevoland was still called Zuidweststad (English: South West City) on the first sketches, but in the 1970s it became called Almere, named after the early medieval name of the Zuiderzee. The first house in Almere was finished in 1976. At that time the town was still controlled by the Openbaar Lichaam Zuidelijke IJsselmeerpolders (Z.IJ.P.), with a Landdrost. In 1984 Almere became an official municipality. Originally, Almere was envisioned as a town with multiple centres. This idea was later abandoned in favor of allowing neighbourhoods like Tussen de Vaarten to be built. There is also a difference between the way houses are built in the oldest and the newest parts of the city. The housing plan in Almere in the 1970s was basic functionality and a levelling of social status. However, starting in the 1990s more exclusive homes with striking designs were built (e.g., in the Regenboogbuurt).

Article source: http://wn.com/Dj_Kevv_@_Club_Storm_Almere


Today’s final of A Dal 2015 featured a wide range of music styles and artistic performances, including a Celtic ballad, electronic music, a 1920s-style cabaret song, and a classic schlager in Hungarian language.

Boggie, winner of the Hungarian final

Check out the Full gallery

After an exciting show, which was kicked off by a joint performance of all eight competing artists, the public picked the winner out of four remaining superfinalists by televoting. Boggie will represent Hungary in the 2015 Eurovision Song Contest!

You can watch her performance of Wars For Nothing below:

Boggie

BOGGIE is a project of two young songwriters, singer Boglárka Csemer and keyboardist Áron Sebestyén. Melody is the central and essential element the music of BOGGIE. The songs are woven around the magical melodies delivered by Boglárka’s unique voice, singing in French and English and her native Hungarian. Her voice draws the listener into the enchanted world of French chanson as well as the emotional intensity of modern pop music intertwined with the playfulness and musical explorations of
jazz.

The group was formed in 2010, the two founding members, singer Boglárka and keyboard player Áron, were soon joined by a full band to complete the present line-up: Tamás Szabó on drums, Mihály Simkó-Várnagy on bass and electric cello, Izsák Farkas on electric viola. As early as 2012 their song Japánkert (‘Japanese Garden’) was rewarded the Special Prize of the Hungarian Jazz Association.

The first self titled BOGGIE album came out in 2013 on the indie label Tom-Tom Records Hungary. The album reached number 3 on Billboard Jazz Album Chart as well as number 17 on Billboard World Music Album Chart. The high chart ranking of the album was due to the massive success of the album’s first video single, Nouveau Parfum, which went viral in early 2014, earning a view count of 30 million and numerous media features worldwide.

Their follow-up album, All Is One Is All, came out in October 2014. BOGGIE have toured numerous European cities already several times – Frankfurt, Munich, Vienna, Amsterdam as well as Paris, where on one occasion they performed at the renowned festival Jazz Sur Seine. Their first American tour took place in the autumn of 2014 starting in New York.


Quotes and Impressions

While the rehearsals were still ongoing, we met some of the singers backstage – watch the impressions in our videos below!

The Line-Up

The following eight acts competed in the Final of A Dal 2015 (jury points in the first voting round in brackets, super-finalists in bold):

  • Bálint Gájer – That’s How It Goes (0 points)
  • Boggie – Wars For Nothing (24 points)
  • Spoon – Keep Marching On (20 points)
  • Kati Wolf – Ne engedj el (16 points)
  • Ádám Szabó – Give Me Your Love (28 points)
  • PASSED – Mesmerize (0 points)
  • Ív – Fire (4 points)
  • Zoltán Mujahid – Beside You (20 points)

Hungary: Meet the finalists

Check out the Full gallery

The Voting

There were two rounds of voting tonight. First the expert jury – Magdi Rúzsa, Philip Rákay, Jen? Csiszár and Pierrot – have picked the four songs they liked best by giving 10, 8, 6, and 4 points to the acts after all the songs had been performed.

Then it was up to the TV viewers to pick a winner out of the four super-finalist by means of televoting.

The Interval

In the interval, the band Leander Rising, who had been part of the quarter-final line-up of A Dal, showed an acoustic performance.

Of course, András Kállay-Saunders, who had represented Hungary in the 2014 Eurovision Song Contest and reached a smashing fifth place in the Grand Final, was also present to perform a medley of his songs.

The Presenters

The final was hosted by Csilla Tatár and Levente Harsányi. Csilla Tatár had previously been the host of various TV shows, including a popular morning show.

Levente Harsányi already was a backstage presenter in A Dal 2014. He will be the first and last point of contact with the artists before their performances, and he will make sure viewers feel involved in the behind the scenes events. Levente will also host Dal+, the new aftershow broadcast.

Watch it again!

If you missed tonight’s show, you can watch it again on-demand in our WebTV player!

Article source: http://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=its_boggie_for_hungary




Post updated: 01/03/2015







Oversee the delivery of all contracted Product Development services, across functions and locations, ensuring service and quality excellence, adherence to partnership-specific processes and service levels, cross-functional integration, identification and mitigation of protocol and partnership risks, and delivery consistency.Represent One Voice to the customer, form the key delivery link between customer and Quintiles, and provide operational and partnership governance at the JOC (chair role, or similar) and ESC (representative/member).Accountabilities include improvement of financial performance, process and performance optimization across contracted trials/projects, enablement of Qu …


Submission Deadline: 14/03/2015


Contact email: http://eu.experteer.com/account/signup_now/expatica_com/3023472







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Article source: http://jobs.expatica.com/netherlands/Sr-DirectorVP-Delivery-Head-Global-Operations_96118.html


Sketch-sensations BEASTS are among more than 200 comedy acts at Brighton Fringe

Sketch-sensations BEASTS are among more than 200 comedy acts at Brighton Fringe

Brighton Fringe has launched its 2015 programme online – starting the countdown to a record-breaking year for the biggest arts festival in England.

Running from May 1 to 31, 750 events are confirmed so far, the highest number ever to appear at the festival. About 250,000 people are expected to attend the festival, which will showcase 233 world premieres.

The programme includes two internationally-acclaimed cabaret artists: Camille O’Sullivan, original star of La Clique; and Tina C, comic creation of the multi-award-winning Christopher Green.

Tim Cook, the Royal Court Young Writer, returns to premiere Crushed, set during the 2010 student protests. Other theatrical offerings include Wildspark’s The Bombing of the Grand Hotel, a visceral new play that tells the real-life story of the unlikely relationship between bomber Pat Magee and Jo Berry, whose father was killed in the blast, and Black is the Colour of My Voice, Apphia Campbell’s hit one-woman show inspired by the life of Nina Simone.

BrightonFringeLogoThe Bucket Club’s Lorraine Alan, a modern re-telling of the Selkie myth – with live electronic sound design, song, and several hundred plastic bottles – which won the Brighton Fringe Excellence Award at Edinburgh Fringe last year, makes a much-anticipated appearance.

Comedy comes courtesy of more than 200 acts, including: sketch-sensations BEASTS; John Hegley, “comedy’s poet laureate” (The Independent); Radio 4 favourite John Osborne and Mock the Week’s Zoe Lyons.

A total of 60 international productions will appear, including: a concert from the Soweto Spiritual Singers; I Am Not Antigone, from the Netherland’s Idreman Foundation; Sjoerd Meijer’s The Liberation of an Angry Little Man, winner of the Best Show at Amsterdam Fringe in 2013; and PAND 7090, which scooped the top prize at Amsterdam Fringe last year. Audiences can also see life-size elephant and giraffe puppets at the Largest Marionette Circus in the World, a UK premiere from Poland.

Graphic novelists and comics creators will present a series of events at Sallis Benney Theatre and the legendary Andie Airfix, who has created some of the most memorable music designs of the last 30 years, makes a welcome return.

A total of 181 venues will host Brighton Fringe events, including: the ever-popular Spiegeltent, which returns to the Old Steine; Sussex County Cricket Club, where a wedding reception with a difference will be performed; and Brighton Racecourse, which welcomes Hydrocracker Youth Theatre for a site-specific play about Brighton’s hidden histories.

Otherplace Productions celebrates 10 years of Brighton Fringe with its biggest programme yet. The flourishing Brighton-based production company has taken up residency in The Basement, one of Brighton’s leading arts venues, and is relocating its large-scale, pop-up venue The Warren to the grounds of St Peter’s Church.

Julian Caddy, managing director of Brighton Fringe, said: “Brighton Fringe is more than just a festival: it is a living, breathing, year-round artistic ecosystem that needs to be sustained. With the right support we will continually reach out to more and more people, so we thank all our partners for their continued confidence in us. We look forward to working with you for many years to come.”

Article source: http://brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/countdown-brighton-fringe-begins-programme-online/




F1 needs an image makeover!

F1 is facing a crisis! Falling attendance at combined spectator and TV-audience levels, increasingly disillusioned fans, a raft of struggling suppliers (teams), reducing sponsorship base and, crucially, dwindling outlets (race promoters and TV transmitters). 

Last year Spa officially hosted just 44,000 paying attendees – 10 per cent down on 2013 – on Sunday, despite the grand prix venue having a catchment area comprising Paris (Elf, Renault), Amsterdam and northern Germany (Sebastian Vettel, Nico Rosberg, Mercedes), the last-named due to the Nurburgring sitting out 2014 due to its illogical rotating deal with Hockenheim.

Alarming drop in TV audience

TV audiences proved equally alarming: The average UK live audience, for Sky and BBC, dropped below the three million mark, with Germany’s RTL (free-to-air) failing to hit its golden five million figure. Sky Deutschland? Less than half a million.

All this begs the question: where has F1 gone so wrong of late? Worryingly, a meeting called by F1 tsar Bernie Ecclestone in Spa to discuss this very aspect missed the sweet spot. “It was a bit like the blind discussing the latest fashion in sunglasses,” said one attendee. “No one has a clue what to look for.”

Pirelli motorsport director Paul Hembery admited to being concerned about the sport’s apparently knee-jerk reactions in its attempts to spice the show as it seeks to reverse the trend. ”When you’re in business, the first thing you do is try to understand your customer,” he said. “I think it’s very dangerous for a sport like F1 to invent rules, regulations and ideas without extensively understanding what the customer expects from it.”

True, new circuits are joining the fray; but, over the past decade, F1 has lost no fewer than five of the 10 new venues it attracted. In primary markets the broadcast landscape has changed dramatically since CVC Capital Partners acquired the majority slice of F1′s commercial rights in 2006. Customer service (fan engagement) is basically non-existent.

The reason for F1′s malaise is historical. When Ecclestone’s Formula One Management operation eventually sealed the deal to acquire F1′s commercial rights in 2000 when McLaren Mercedes driver, Mika Hakkinen, was reigning world champion, prompting the German car company to trumpet its achievements.

Ferrari had taken the constructors’ title, a tale told by every pack of Marlboros. BMW made its entry, Jaguar bought Stewart, Toyota was about to join, while Renault negotiated to acquire Benetton. Not only did they throw the might of their global ad spends at F1, but these powerhouses brought in blue-chip partners, who in turn screamed their F1 links.

The Tyre war

Bridgestone and Michelin were engrossed in a tyre war every bit as ferocious on-track as it was on billboards.Collectively they bought ?3000 Paddock Club passes by the hundred, signed for “bridge-and-board” circuit signage packages and took expansive and expensive merchandising areas.

Toyota is estimated to have blown upwards of ?10million on rental alone for its enormous merchandising palaces during a nine-year tenure in F1, while stands erected by the rest were not much smaller. Advertising came in the form of double-page spreads everywhere.

Dealers, too, joined in when F1 came to town, running local promotions and feting VIPs and key customers during events. Thus F1 enjoyed staggering exposure on a truly stratospheric scale, all paid for by teams and their commercial/technical partners. When F1 folk needed to consult market research, some company somewhere had commissioned the numbers.

In short, FOM had no need to spend a brass bean on marketing, instead enjoying the luxury of suppliers and third parties funding all such activities, who told its message. Then manufacturer teams left in droves, disillusioned by the lack of return on (massive) investment and taking their partners with them.

An anecdote linked to Bridgestone goes some way towards illustrating the protection/exploitation-of-rights dilemma: when the Japanese tyre company entered the sport in 1997, it planned to distribute doormats bearing the words ‘F1 – The Challenge’ to thousands of outlets globally.

The commercial rights holder allegedly demanded a licence fee running to many millions, prompting Bridgestone to destroy its mats. Forget Bridgestone’s benefits from the campaign: what price free F1 awareness in virtually every tyre outlet across the world?

Simultaneously, tobacco advertising had been outlawed in Europe (and elsewhere), and as the baccy ban neared, so cigarette companies ramped up their activities. This initially created greater awareness for F1, but not without causing a massive vacuum upon their departure post-2007. Did FOM step into the breach? Of course not. At that point CVC began leveraging its two-thirds majority on F1′s commercial rights and, with eyes firmly on a Singapore listing within five years, the investment fund set out to dramatically boost short-term profitability through a combination of cost-slashing and maximisation of turnover. What long-term marketing strategies? 

Instead, hosting fees shot through the affordability ceiling, causing ticket prices to rocket, while TV gradually migrated to pay-per-view channels. This meant that sponsors and partners no longer enjoyed massive audiences, forcing most to negatively reconsider their engagements. Withdrawal resulted in reduced activation, followed by reduced awareness. 

The shift to PPV TV has been drastic for another reason. Where once free-to-air stations – usually national channels – regularly promoted upcoming F1 broadcasts as part of regular scheduling breaks, bringing the sport to the attention of the entire audience spectrum, the current arrangement of shared oft-delayed broadcasts means channels such as BBC and TF1 who take back seats to Sky and Canal+ respectively are no longer enthralled by F1.

After all, why should they carry promo previews that ultimately benefit their opposition? Equally, when Sky or Canal+ run previews, they are preaching to the converted, who have in any event already subscribed.

So F1 gradually slipped down the awareness order, and the only wonder is that it took five years for the effects to wash through the system, which bears testimony to the deep-rooted passion of the sport’s fans, but is equally an indictment of the sport’s commercial owners.

Need to make it a global sport

F1 apologists blame the economic crisis, but their ‘facts’ simply don’t stack up. Porsche and Audi commit F1-level budgets to the World Endurance Championship; Volkswagen and Hyundai spend massive amounts on World Rally Championship campaigns. BMW commits an estimated ?75million per season to the DTM, in real terms a national championship, while the respective spends of Mercedes and Audi cannot be significantly less.

Yes, Honda returns in 2015 – marking the first return of a major marque in six years – but, crucially, as engine supplier only. No others are on the horizon, despite most motor manufacturers being bullish about their immediate and longer-term futures.

Global sport spend too is up: Manchester United recently signed a record 10-year shirt deal worth ?90million per annum, while the top five European football leagues last year turned over a combined ?20billion, probably five times F1′s 2013 cumulative turnover. According to reports, F1′s TV audience is shaded by Turkey’s football league.

Yet F1 does not seem to accept that it’s staring a crisis in the face. This, though, stands in stark contrast to findings of the world’s largest professional network, auditing giant PriceWaterhouseCoopers, which foresees global sports spend increasing at the rate of four per cent per annum. PWC estimates the market to be worth ?110billion annually, and in a recent report foresaw a “resurgence of financial services and automobile companies to sponsorship”. 

A global survey undertaken last year found that over the five years from 2009 – the exact period of the global economic crisis – the sport-sponsorship market grew by almost 20 per cent, thus further contradicting the claims made at noon last Saturday.

The underlying message to F1 is clear: establish a structured, strategic marketing department PDQ, or the downward spiral will continue, particularly if new/social media are excluded from the equation.

“Adapt or die”, it’s called.

Article source: http://www.sportskeeda.com/f1/why-f1-needs-to-market-itself-with-immediate-effect


Tonight A Dal 2015 will come to an end. It is one of the most successful national selection shows for the Eurovision Song Contest, with an average audience of 1.4 million for this year’s semi-final shows.

Out of an initial 30 acts, after three quarter finals and two semi-finals, eight are still in the running for the ticket to Vienna.

The Line-Up

The following eight acts will compete in the Final of A Dal 2015:

  • Boglárka Csemer – “Boggie” – Wars For Nothing
  • Ádám Szabó – Give Me Your Love
  • Zoltán Mujahid – Beside You
  • Spoon – Keep Marching On
  • Kati Wolf – Ne engedj el
  • PASSED – Mesmerize
  • Ív – Fire
  • Bálint Gájer – That’s How It Goes

Hungary: Meet the finalists

Check out the Full gallery

You can learn more about the finalists in our feature block below!

The Voting

There will be two rounds of voting tonight. First the expert jury consisting of Magdi Rúzsa, Philip Rákay, Jen? Csiszár and Pierrot will pick the four best songs. The jurors will allocate 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 points to the acts only after all the songs have been performed.

Then the televoters alone will select the winner out of those four remaining entries in a super-final.

The Presenters

The final will be hosted by Csilla Tatár and Levente Harsányi. Csilla Tatár had previously been the host of various TV shows, including a popular morning show.

Levente Harsányi already was a backstage presenter in A Dal 2014. He will be the first and last point of contact with the artists before their performances, and he will make sure viewers feel involved in the behind the scenes events. Levente will also host Dal+, the new aftershow broadcast.

Boggie

BOGGIE is a project of two young songwriters, singer Boglárka Csemer and keyboardist Áron Sebestyén. Melody is the central and essential element the music of BOGGIE. The songs are woven around the magical melodies delivered by Boglárka’s unique voice, singing in French and English and her native Hungarian. Her voice draws the listener into the enchanted world of French chanson as well as the emotional intensity of modern pop music intertwined with the playfulness and musical explorations of
jazz.

The group was formed in 2010, the two founding members, singer Boglárka and keyboard player Áron, were soon joined by a full band to complete the present line-up: Tamás Szabó on drums, Mihály Simkó-Várnagy on bass and electric cello, Izsák Farkas on electric viola. As early as 2012 their song Japánkert (‘Japanese Garden’) was rewarded the Special Prize of the Hungarian Jazz Association.

The first self titled BOGGIE album came out in 2013 on the indie label Tom-Tom Records Hungary. The album reached number 3 on Billboard Jazz Album Chart as well as number 17 on Billboard World Music Album Chart. The high chart ranking of the album was due to the massive success of the album’s first video single, Nouveau Parfum, which went viral in early 2014, earning a view count of 30 million and numerous media features worldwide.

Their follow-up album, All Is One Is All, came out in October 2014. BOGGIE have toured numerous European cities already several times – Frankfurt, Munich, Vienna, Amsterdam as well as Paris, where on one occasion they performed at the renowned festival Jazz Sur Seine. Their first American tour took place in the autumn of 2014 starting in New York.

Ádám Szabó

My name is Ádám Szabó. I am an average twenty-year-old boy who loves music. I have been addicted to loving the accordion. I studied at Lukin László Music School in Érd then at Weiner Leo Conservatory. My teacher at the Music School was Szokolay Zoltán and Ernyei László taught me at the Conservatory.

I took part in many competitions in Hungary and abroad. When I was 18 I entered for Hungary’s Got Talent Competition. I was chosen from 5 000 people to get into the finals.

When I was twenty-one the song (Hadd legyen más – Let it be different) composed by me was among the best 30 songs of the Eurovision Song Contest in Hungary. At the same age I tried my luck in another talent spotter competition, in the X Factor where I came in fifth.

I have been studying playing the accordion at Liszt Ferenc Music Academy. I also learn to sing at Éliás Gyula.

Zoltán Mujahid

My name is Zoltán Mujahid. I was born on in 1979 in Karachi, Pakistan of a Hungarian mother and Pakistani father. I am a Hungarian national. Music had always played vital part in my life. At the age of five I began to learn Indian classical music in Karachi. Few yeas later I already took good places at talent competitions. In Hungary I went to music school and learned to play classical piano at the Weiner Leo Conservatory. Later I made my entry into jazz.

As a founder member of my secondary school’s musical studio, called the Pet?fi Musical Studio I played the lead in gorgeous plays such as the Gospel of Maria, Attic, Jungle Book, Dr. Hertz. We had enormous successes not only at home but also in the neighboring countries. At the age of seventeen I started learning jazz singing.

A first year student at the Music Academy I entered the first series of the TV2 talent show called Megastar. With my own composition called Mondd, mennyit ér I qualified for the finals. After the competition in 2004 I went on a cross-country concert tour with the „Megastar” team.

After I finished my studies I busied myself writing songs, teaching music and playing in music clubs with my band the Freak. In 2008 I met the executive of Silver Star Records. The result of this cooperation was a maxi CD and video clip that came out in the end of the year entitled Els? hó (First snow). The song is my own composition.

In 2011 I moved to London to fill up with energy in an exciting and inspiring environment and to return with an abundance of new experiences. I finally came home in the summer of 2012 and immediately set to work. I wrote and recorded my latest song Három év (Three years). I do believe writing and singing Hungarian songs in Hungary is a worthy and rewarding task.

Spoon

Spoon includes: singing, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, percussions (mainly cajon).

The band was born about one and a half years ago, in the form of a high-school garage band, started by three classmates and a school mate. They performed on many school events an few concerts on their own.

This year they joined the Hungarian singing competition, X-factor, where they currently compete in the live shows.

Members of the band are:

  • Péter Földesi(20): guitar, vocal
  • Kristóf Teremy(19): cajon, piano, vocal
  • Miklós Nagy(20): bass guitar, vocal
  • Márton Grósz(20): singing, rhythm guitar

Kati Wolf

Kati was born in 1974 in Szentendre. She lives in Budapest and is married with two children. She was a reading-out choral conducting major at The Zeneakadémia (Academy of Music) – College of Education.

Kati was first discovered in 1981 when she sang the theme song of the incredibly successful cartoon tale titled Vuk. After graduating from college, she sang in several bands (Studio South, Sunny Dance Band, New Chocolate, Avocaldo, Enjoy).

In 2009, her first solo album titled “Wolf-áramlat” was released and her father, a well-known Hungarian composer, wrote the songs.

In 2010 Kati was cast on The X Factor Hungary and came in at #6 on the tv show. Her most successful single to date is „Szerelem, miért múlsz?” (What About My Dreams?). With this records, Kati represented Hungary at the 2011 Eurovision Song Contest in Düsseldorf. She finished at #22.

PASSED

PASSED has four members: David Godzsak, Levente Szabo, Dorottya Nizalowski and Fanni Nizalowski. Fanni and Dorottya have been playing the harp for 10 years now, and are currently studying in the Szent István Music High School. The twins had numerous concerts in the past two years. They are highly proficient in music theory, which has a great impact in the writing process of the PASSED songs.

David Godzsak has been playing the guitar and bass for 7 years, and already had two rockbands, one which he used to have concerts with every single weekend. He earned a certificate at imPro Budapest School of Music Technology, where he mastered his music production skills. David is one half of the music duo called GOMA.

The other half is Levente Szabo, who has been playing the piano for 13 years, and is a music producer of 3 years. He also earned a certificate at imPro.

The two members of GOMA met in high school. They were running the school radio together, then continued their studies at Budapest, where they met Dorottya and Fanni. PASSED was formed in the summer of 2014. Since then they had many concerts, and worked together in the music section of the 2014 Miss Universe Hungary. Their first EP is set to be released in the January of 2015.

Ív

I started singing with basic jazz-standards in a real “old-boys” band, quite long time ago.Then I became the main vocalist for a short time in the underground scene of Budapest, in the band called Mantra Porno.

In 2010-2011, I founded the PLÜSSS, my first vocal group. We played jazz -soul covers. Members of the band were Nóra halász, Juli Horányi /X-Faktor/, and me.

With Valami Zsuzsi started the short period of the mainstream in my life, then I made a new band with a friend, called Ginger. Those times I met my current manager, Zsolt Jeges.

About ÍV: I’ve been in a TV show called Sztárban Sztár last winter, when I stepped on the stage as singer-partner of ByeAlex. That was ÍV’s debut appearence.

Bálint Gájer

Bálint Gájer was born in Marcali, Hungary, in 1980. In 1994 he formed the Marcato Percussion Ensemble which he was as a full-time member of for ten years.Two years later he started playing music as the drummer of the Balaton MK Horn Ensemble.

In 2010 he successfully acquired a degree in jazz studies with a teacher certification in The Liszt Academy of Music of Hungary and the debut record of his newfound group, Group’N'Swing was released. The second album, entitled Botrány (scandal) followed in 2012.

In 2013 Gájer finished second in the Hungarian version of the talent show The Voice. He also received a Fonogram-award as a member of Group’N’Swing in the category of “The Best domestic entertaining record” for Botrány.

In 2013, Gájer was honoured with the Alle Elegance Award for winning the title of “The most elegant musician.”


Article source: http://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=watch_tonight_the_final_of_a_dal_in_hungary





AMSTERDAM — A couple of days into the International Documentary Film Festival in Amsterdam (IDFA) — the world’s largest documentary event — it struck me that the festival itself would have made an entertaining documentary.

It wouldn’t focus on the IDFA the public got to see, though — the actual festival, with 300 international films, and cameos by such heavily-decorated documentary makers as Laura Poitras, whose film “Citizenfour” won this year’s Oscar for documentary feature.

Continue reading below

The doc I’d like to see would go behind the scenes, at Docs for Sale. This elbow-jostling, deal-making marketplace is where filmmakers — including, this past year, myself — bring their new documentaries in the hope that they’ll land a sales agent who’ll shop them to distributors and broadcasters. The stakes are high for filmmakers who may have spent years laboring over a documentary.

I attended IDFA for the first time in November as both a journalist, reporting on the challenges filmmakers face when they’re trying to get their documentaries noticed, and a filmmaker, confronting those challenges myself.

Since 2008 I’ve been working on a documentary called “Circus Without Borders,” with Susan Gray, of Northern Light Productions, in Allston. (Full disclosure: The Boston Globe Foundation is one of my film’s funders.) It’s about two circus troupes in remote places — an Inuit circus, in Arctic Canada; and a West African circus, in Guinea. Both communities face disturbing challenges — youth suicide in the Arctic, desperate poverty in Africa — but the acrobats dream big, and use their talents to change their fates.










Officially, Susan is the film’s director and I’m the producer, but we’ve both been fund-raisers, grant writers, social-media marketers, public speakers, travel agents, and event planners. (This is what it can take, these days, to get an indie documentary off the ground with no underwriter or broadcaster lined up.) One of the disappointing lessons of IDFA for me was that once the hard work of making the film is done, the job of getting anyone to see it seems even harder.

“It’s the Wild West of distribution right now,” said Beth Hoppe, the chief of programming for PBS, in a telephone interview.

‘It’s the Wild Westof distribution right now.’

One reason is that there are more filmmakers, thus more documentaries, than ever before. “Interest in making documentaries is growing, and . . . the apparatus for making them has become so available and accessible,” said filmmaker Marc Fields, who teaches at Emerson College. Competition is fierce in the marketplace.

“If you have a doc on the Middle East,” wrote veteran documentary sales agent Jan Rofekamp in a hard-nosed memo to first-time IDFA delegates, “you must realize that there are 30 of these subjects every year and that yours needs to stick out.” Rofekamp is owner and CEO of Films Transit International.

“ASTONISH ME!” he wrote. “Some filmmakers seem to forget what this is all about!”

I would have loved the chance to astonish him but he wore his ID turned around so his name wasn’t visible. I couldn’t help but think it was intentional. Eventually someone pointed him out, immersed in meetings in the IDFA cafe. Susan nabbed his associate.

“Can we talk a moment?”

“One,” the woman said cooly. “Or two.”

We speed-talked our pitch.“There have been a lot of films about circuses,” she said dismissively, adding: “I hope I haven’t depressed you.”

Depressed? Me? We’d just spent three weeks e-mailing 300 sales agents and distributors to see if they’d meet with us, and almost no one answered. The names of some of the companies seemed to reflect the dog-eat-dog nature of the business: CatDoc, Dogwoof, Mongrel Media.

A few of those who did reply were not encouraging. The film was “not suitable” for them. It was too long. It was too short. It wouldn’t fit into broadcasters’ “slots.”

“We are not doing entertaining docs,” wrote one distributor, seeming to scold us. “The film is not only entertaining but the circus is a big part of the film.”

One distributor in Hollywood was very interested, but insisted on locking it in before we went to IDFA. He proposed to be our “strategic advisor” for a fee of $10,000, “made in one payment now.” According to his proposal, “We do not guarantee any results at all.”

Somehow we cobbled together a dozen meetings, which was not, I thought, a great return. At first, it was discouraging. Hardly any of the agents had watched our film so we had to talk them through the story, which is hard to do quickly — i.e. before their eyes glazed over — with a film that’s very visual.

A British sales agent advised us that hundreds of new docs have flooded the market in the last three years. “It’s getting more and more competitive all the time,” said a Canadian film distributor, noting that just having a film to sell isn’t enough these days to impress buyers.

You need a ready-made “community” of followers.

You need to have the means to launch “some sort of event” when the film comes out.

You need “merch” (merchandise) to sell at the event.

You need a charity that will benefit from sales of the film.

He knows a documentary maker, he said, who was thrilled his film had been pirated — it meant the pirates actually recognized it.

As for the new landscape of online marketplaces, such as Apple iTunes and Amazon Instant Video, they may be great for viewers but less so for filmmakers, he said. “You can spend thousands of dollars putting these things out on a platform, but no one will know how to find it.”

How about getting a doc on US TV? Not much traction there, we were informed. Sales agents told us PBS is the major broadcast player in the documentary scene, but there just aren’t enough slots for a diverse array of films.

(PBS maintains it’s accepting more documentaries now than ever, but concedes that there is more financial support for documentaries outside the United States.)

But we didn’t come to IDFA to get discouraged. I decided to follow another piece of Jan Rofekamp’s advice: “Get informed about the various social events. . . . Drinks and parties are plentiful!”

I went to a cocktail party, but no deals were struck. It was a great place to eavesdrop, though. I overheard a film editor passionately describing the Swedish film he’d worked on — “Those Who Said No” — which was premiering at IDFA. It revealed how thousands of political prisoners were secretly tortured and killed after the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. The perpetrators were never prosecuted and today hold high-ranking government positions.

“Do you think anyone will buy it?” someone asked him.

“Who knows?,” he said shrugging. “It isn’t sexy.”

This would have made a great scene in that IDFA documentary, I thought. I’d almost be tempted to make it myself.

But I’d have to find a distributor.

Postscript: After IDFA, we got seven offers to represent our film, counting the company guaranteeing no results. We’re going with Journeyman Pictures.

Linda Matchan can be reached at linda.matchan@globe.com.

Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/movies/2015/02/28/where-documentaries-get-sold-not/kRssNFjDHLKdiiFbTEjPIO/story.html


Concern over environmental and roiling social issues tug at hedge funds’ hearts — and bottom lines.

Traders Magazine Online News, February 27, 2015

Renee Caruthers


In the movies and the popular imagination, Wall Street is all about the money, and doesn’t have much heart. Think of Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko extolling the virtues of greed, or Leonardo DiCaprio’s Jordan Belfort breaking laws both financial and moral in The Wolf of Wall Street. But if investment trends in environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues are any indication, Wall Street does care — about repressive regimes, greenhouse gas emissions, reasonable gun control and other heart-rending topics.

Investing with a conscience is gaining ground. In the U.S., sustainable, responsible and impact investing has grown to $6.57 trillion in U.S.-domiciled assets under management at the start of 2014, according to the Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment, also known as US SIF Foundation. That’s a 76 percent rise from $3.74 trillion under management at the start of 2012.

What’s more, heart-wrenching news events that paralyze the country can have an impact on the investing community as well. The reaction of institutional investors to the massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., was reflected in investing statistics, according to Meg Vorhees, US SIF director of research and operations. “Since 2012, we have seen a fivefold increase in policies that restrict investment in firearms and weapons manufacturers,” she said in a recent online presentation for US SIF’s latest investment trend report.

It’s not all emotions, however. Investing with a conscience may in fact deliver higher returns. Seventy-six percent of respondents in US SIF’s recent report on investing listed returns as a motivator for their ESG investing strategies. Last summer, in a research report on ESG investing, New York-based asset management firm New Amsterdam Partners found a clear correlation between ESG strategies and returns. “Higher return companies, in aggregate, had better ESG ratings,” wrote Indrani De, New Amsterdam Partners’ senior director of quantitative research, and Michelle Clayman, a managing partner and the firm’s chief investment officer.

“A useful way to think about it is that environmental and social factors can help us to identify company risks,” said Jonas Kron, director of shareholder advocacy for Trillium Asset Management. For example, an oil company with seemingly minor environmental or safety violations may in fact be at higher risk for a larger accident that could affect returns, he suggested.

In recent years, a variety of topics have helped push environmental and social issues to the forefront. The conflict in Darfur prompted many organizations to “divest” or economically boycott Sudan. Four states (Illinois, New Jersey, Oregon and Maine), at least 17 universities and numerous rights groups joined the boycott.

Organizations pushing to raise awareness of climate change have also spurred increased investing tied to environmental causes.

“As Bill McKibben and 350.org have made very persuasive arguments on why institutions should not be invested in fossil fuel companies, we have seen increasing interest from existing clients and new clients who want to work with an asset manager who knows how to manage either a fossil-fuel-free or low-carbon portfolio,” Kron said.

For more information on related topics, visit the following channels:

  • Buyside
  • People

Article source: http://www.tradersmagazine.com/news/buyside/more-noble-returns-the-buyside-does-good-113530-1.html


Owners of Rocky and Luella, Kate Bunton and Julia Korol, have set out to fill the holes of Chicago’s boutique market. Opening in Logan Square this past September, they’ve finally brought another boutique to the neighborhood, which has slim retail options, to say the least. “I think we are sort of on the precipice here in Logan,” says Bunton, who expressed that she expects the shopping scene in Logan to grow in the next couple of years. Doubling as an event space, they often host local fashion bloggers and businesses for styling events, workshops and more.

“Our primary goal is to have a lot of brands that don’t have stockists already in Chicago, the Midwest or sometimes the whole country,” explains Korol. With men and women’s clothing and accessories from the likes of French brand Lespard (formerly known as Honore), Amsterdam’s O My Bag and Rachel Rose, they’ve created a destination shopping experience that you’re not going to get anywhere else in Chicago. Korol’s love of fashion blogs and Pinterest, where she came across difficult to find brands, felt disgruntled by never actually being able to touch, feel or try anything on before making purchases. Rocky and Luella changes all that.

Bunton and Korol, both 27, met working at Anthropologie, where they learned the ins and outs of running a retail store. Although they appreciated the educational experience, they were eager to start a business that mirrored their own style. Their customer base includes “people who are up on trends, keeping ahead on designers that are up and coming,” says Bunton, “and people who live in Logan who have nowhere to shop.” The clothes filling the racks of Rocky and Luella are clean cut, fresh and streamlined, all capable of meshing into practically anyone’s closet. Even though the brands are new to the city, Bunton and Korol carefully selected items that work with Chicago’s style and necessities.

Winter fashion advice and must-haves according to Bunton and Korol:

Bunton suggests finding unexpected ways to make a winter wardrobe fashionable, like donning bright red lips or wearing cool snow-friendly shoes. Her favorite boots are Chippewa, whereas Korol favors a pair of Frye boots that are meant to be beat up a bit.

Thoughtful layering. Think about how your layers create a cohesive outfit, like a cashmere sweater with a blue jean jacket under your winter coat.

Structured pieces in neutral styles are important in regards to mixing and matching, as well as layering. Aim for chambray tops and basic button downs. “You can do a lot with them,” assures Bunton.

Both women are all about statement necklaces and other jewelry when changing up their looks.

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Article source: http://www.chicagomag.com/style-shopping/February-2015/RockyLuella/


Tonight A Dal 2015 will come to an end. It is one of the most successful national selection shows for the Eurovision Song Contest, with an average audience of 1.4 million for this year’s semi-final shows.

Out of an initial 30 acts, after three quarter finals and two semi-finals, eight are still in the running for the ticket to Vienna.

The Line-Up

The following eight acts will compete in the Final of A Dal 2015:

  • Boglárka Csemer – “Boggie” – Wars For Nothing
  • Ádám Szabó – Give Me Your Love
  • Zoltán Mujahid – Beside You
  • Spoon – Keep Marching On
  • Kati Wolf – Ne engedj el
  • PASSED – Mesmerize
  • Ív – Fire
  • Bálint Gájer – That’s How It Goes

Hungary: Meet the finalists

Check out the Full gallery

You can learn more about the finalists in our feature block below!

The Voting

There will be two rounds of voting tonight. First the expert jury consisting of Magdi Rúzsa, Philip Rákay, Jen? Csiszár and Pierrot will pick the four best songs. The jurors will allocate 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 points to the acts only after all the songs have been performed.

Then the televoters alone will select the winner out of those four remaining entries in a super-final.

The Presenters

The final will be hosted by Csilla Tatár and Levente Harsányi. Csilla Tatár had previously been the host of various TV shows, including a popular morning show.

Levente Harsányi already was a backstage presenter in A Dal 2014. He will be the first and last point of contact with the artists before their performances, and he will make sure viewers feel involved in the behind the scenes events. Levente will also host Dal+, the new aftershow broadcast.

Boggie

BOGGIE is a project of two young songwriters, singer Boglárka Csemer and keyboardist Áron Sebestyén. Melody is the central and essential element the music of BOGGIE. The songs are woven around the magical melodies delivered by Boglárka’s unique voice, singing in French and English and her native Hungarian. Her voice draws the listener into the enchanted world of French chanson as well as the emotional intensity of modern pop music intertwined with the playfulness and musical explorations of
jazz.

The group was formed in 2010, the two founding members, singer Boglárka and keyboard player Áron, were soon joined by a full band to complete the present line-up: Tamás Szabó on drums, Mihály Simkó-Várnagy on bass and electric cello, Izsák Farkas on electric viola. As early as 2012 their song Japánkert (‘Japanese Garden’) was rewarded the Special Prize of the Hungarian Jazz Association.

The first self titled BOGGIE album came out in 2013 on the indie label Tom-Tom Records Hungary. The album reached number 3 on Billboard Jazz Album Chart as well as number 17 on Billboard World Music Album Chart. The high chart ranking of the album was due to the massive success of the album’s first video single, Nouveau Parfum, which went viral in early 2014, earning a view count of 30 million and numerous media features worldwide.

Their follow-up album, All Is One Is All, came out in October 2014. BOGGIE have toured numerous European cities already several times – Frankfurt, Munich, Vienna, Amsterdam as well as Paris, where on one occasion they performed at the renowned festival Jazz Sur Seine. Their first American tour took place in the autumn of 2014 starting in New York.

Ádám Szabó

My name is Ádám Szabó. I am an average twenty-year-old boy who loves music. I have been addicted to loving the accordion. I studied at Lukin László Music School in Érd then at Weiner Leo Conservatory. My teacher at the Music School was Szokolay Zoltán and Ernyei László taught me at the Conservatory.

I took part in many competitions in Hungary and abroad. When I was 18 I entered for Hungary’s Got Talent Competition. I was chosen from 5 000 people to get into the finals.

When I was twenty-one the song (Hadd legyen más – Let it be different) composed by me was among the best 30 songs of the Eurovision Song Contest in Hungary. At the same age I tried my luck in another talent spotter competition, in the X Factor where I came in fifth.

I have been studying playing the accordion at Liszt Ferenc Music Academy. I also learn to sing at Éliás Gyula.

Zoltán Mujahid

My name is Zoltán Mujahid. I was born on in 1979 in Karachi, Pakistan of a Hungarian mother and Pakistani father. I am a Hungarian national. Music had always played vital part in my life. At the age of five I began to learn Indian classical music in Karachi. Few yeas later I already took good places at talent competitions. In Hungary I went to music school and learned to play classical piano at the Weiner Leo Conservatory. Later I made my entry into jazz.

As a founder member of my secondary school’s musical studio, called the Pet?fi Musical Studio I played the lead in gorgeous plays such as the Gospel of Maria, Attic, Jungle Book, Dr. Hertz. We had enormous successes not only at home but also in the neighboring countries. At the age of seventeen I started learning jazz singing.

A first year student at the Music Academy I entered the first series of the TV2 talent show called Megastar. With my own composition called Mondd, mennyit ér I qualified for the finals. After the competition in 2004 I went on a cross-country concert tour with the „Megastar” team.

After I finished my studies I busied myself writing songs, teaching music and playing in music clubs with my band the Freak. In 2008 I met the executive of Silver Star Records. The result of this cooperation was a maxi CD and video clip that came out in the end of the year entitled Els? hó (First snow). The song is my own composition.

In 2011 I moved to London to fill up with energy in an exciting and inspiring environment and to return with an abundance of new experiences. I finally came home in the summer of 2012 and immediately set to work. I wrote and recorded my latest song Három év (Three years). I do believe writing and singing Hungarian songs in Hungary is a worthy and rewarding task.

Spoon

Spoon includes: singing, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, percussions (mainly cajon).

The band was born about one and a half years ago, in the form of a high-school garage band, started by three classmates and a school mate. They performed on many school events an few concerts on their own.

This year they joined the Hungarian singing competition, X-factor, where they currently compete in the live shows.

Members of the band are:

  • Péter Földesi(20): guitar, vocal
  • Kristóf Teremy(19): cajon, piano, vocal
  • Miklós Nagy(20): bass guitar, vocal
  • Márton Grósz(20): singing, rhythm guitar

Kati Wolf

Kati was born in 1974 in Szentendre. She lives in Budapest and is married with two children. She was a reading-out choral conducting major at The Zeneakadémia (Academy of Music) – College of Education.

Kati was first discovered in 1981 when she sang the theme song of the incredibly successful cartoon tale titled Vuk. After graduating from college, she sang in several bands (Studio South, Sunny Dance Band, New Chocolate, Avocaldo, Enjoy).

In 2009, her first solo album titled “Wolf-áramlat” was released and her father, a well-known Hungarian composer, wrote the songs.

In 2010 Kati was cast on The X Factor Hungary and came in at #6 on the tv show. Her most successful single to date is „Szerelem, miért múlsz?” (What About My Dreams?). With this records, Kati represented Hungary at the 2011 Eurovision Song Contest in Düsseldorf. She finished at #22.

PASSED

PASSED has four members: David Godzsak, Levente Szabo, Dorottya Nizalowski and Fanni Nizalowski. Fanni and Dorottya have been playing the harp for 10 years now, and are currently studying in the Szent István Music High School. The twins had numerous concerts in the past two years. They are highly proficient in music theory, which has a great impact in the writing process of the PASSED songs.

David Godzsak has been playing the guitar and bass for 7 years, and already had two rockbands, one which he used to have concerts with every single weekend. He earned a certificate at imPro Budapest School of Music Technology, where he mastered his music production skills. David is one half of the music duo called GOMA.

The other half is Levente Szabo, who has been playing the piano for 13 years, and is a music producer of 3 years. He also earned a certificate at imPro.

The two members of GOMA met in high school. They were running the school radio together, then continued their studies at Budapest, where they met Dorottya and Fanni. PASSED was formed in the summer of 2014. Since then they had many concerts, and worked together in the music section of the 2014 Miss Universe Hungary. Their first EP is set to be released in the January of 2015.

Ív

I started singing with basic jazz-standards in a real “old-boys” band, quite long time ago.Then I became the main vocalist for a short time in the underground scene of Budapest, in the band called Mantra Porno.

In 2010-2011, I founded the PLÜSSS, my first vocal group. We played jazz -soul covers. Members of the band were Nóra halász, Juli Horányi /X-Faktor/, and me.

With Valami Zsuzsi started the short period of the mainstream in my life, then I made a new band with a friend, called Ginger. Those times I met my current manager, Zsolt Jeges.

About ÍV: I’ve been in a TV show called Sztárban Sztár last winter, when I stepped on the stage as singer-partner of ByeAlex. That was ÍV’s debut appearence.

Bálint Gájer

Bálint Gájer was born in Marcali, Hungary, in 1980. In 1994 he formed the Marcato Percussion Ensemble which he was as a full-time member of for ten years.Two years later he started playing music as the drummer of the Balaton MK Horn Ensemble.

In 2010 he successfully acquired a degree in jazz studies with a teacher certification in The Liszt Academy of Music of Hungary and the debut record of his newfound group, Group’N'Swing was released. The second album, entitled Botrány (scandal) followed in 2012.

In 2013 Gájer finished second in the Hungarian version of the talent show The Voice. He also received a Fonogram-award as a member of Group’N’Swing in the category of “The Best domestic entertaining record” for Botrány.

In 2013, Gájer was honoured with the Alle Elegance Award for winning the title of “The most elegant musician.”


Article source: http://www.eurovision.tv/page/news?id=watch_tonight_the_final_of_a_dal_in_hungary